Echocardiography

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echocardiography

[‚ek·ō‚kärd·ē′äg·rə·fē]
(medicine)
A diagnostic technique for the heart that uses a transducer held against the chest to send high-frequency sound waves which pass harmlessly into the heart; as they strike structures within the heart, they are reflected back to the transducer and recorded on an oscilloscope.

Echocardiography

 

a method of examining the heart by means of ultrasound. Echocardiography is based on the recording of ultrasonic waves reflected from the surfaces of heart structures differing in density. Under normal conditions, curves are recorded successively from the walls of the aorta and left atrium, the anterior and posterior cusps of the mitral valve, the interventricular septum, and the posterior wall of the left ventricle.

Echocardiography is used to diagnose acquired and, to a lesser extent, congenital valvular diseases. It helps determine the condition of the cusps and the extent of narrowing of the valve openings; it identifies defects in the septa, large transposed blood vessels, and hypoplasia. Echocardiology is also used to diagnose pericarditis with effusion, tumors, and other abnormal conditions. The procedure is used to measure the volume, wall thickness, and mass of the muscular layer of the left ventricle; the stroke volume; and some other parameters of the blood circulation. By combining echocardiography and ultrasonic scanning one can obtain successive images of heart structures that reflect their dynamics during systole and diastole.

REFERENCE

Kardiologiia, 1974, no. 1, pp. 82–86; 1976, no. 6, pp. 15–25.

N. M. MUKHARLIAMOV

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During the echocardiographic study in the same setting, it was observed that the large, mobile thrombus had disappeared from the right atrium and was found lodged in the right pulmonary artery (Figure-2).
Three echocardiographic modalities are used routinely in veterinary cardiology, M mode, two-dimensional echocardiography and Doppler, and each of these methods has its own application (WARE, 2011).
0 mmol/L or taking relevant drugs), abnormal renal function (serum creatinine ≥110 [micro]mol/L), abnormal electrocardiography (Q wave, arrhythmia, or bundle block), valvular stenosis (any degree), more than mild valvular regurgitation, wall motion abnormalities and pericardial effusion on echocardiographic recordings, Assessment Test Score of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease >20, forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity ratio from pulmonary function test <0.
This is one of the first echocardiographic studies of IE comparing HIV-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients and HIV-negative PTB patients in a cohort of 38 patients diagnosed IE based on the modified Duke criteria.
Severe mitral stenosis was defined by echocardiographic criteria as associated with mean transvalular gradient of more than 10 mm of Hg, pulmonary artery pressures of more than 50 mm of Hg and a valve area of less than 1 cm2.
Detailed physical examination and echocardiographic evaluation, particularly the thoracic aorta is must while evaluating a child with dilated left ventricle with severe systolic dysfunction because missing coarctation in such cases might have deadly consequences.
Distribution of patients in two groups with respect to echocardiographic parameters were given in table-II.
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12] However, pending more definitive studies of impact on prognosis, echocardiographic screening for asymptomatic RHD remains, for now, more of a research tool.
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