onomatopoeia

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onomatopoeia

(ŏn'əmăt'əpē`ə) [Gr.,=word-making], in language, the representation of a sound by an imitation thereof; e.g., the cat mews. Poets often convey the meaning of a verse through its very sound. For example, in "Song of the Lotus-Eaters" Tennyson indicates the slow, sensuous, and langorous life of the Lotus-Eaters by the sound of the words he uses to describe the land in which they live:
Here are cool mosses deep,
And through the moss the ivies creep,
And in the stream the long-leaved flowers weep,
And from the craggy ledge the poppy hangs in sleep.
Onomatopoeia can also represent harsh and unpleasant sounds, as in Browning's "Meeting at Night":
A tap at the pane, the quick sharp scratch
And blue spurt of a lighted match.

Onomatopoeia

(pop culture)
The black trench coat–wearing assassin Onomatopoeia hurled onto the pages of a Kevin Smith–penned, Phil Hester and Ande Parks–illustrated story in Green Arrow vol. 3 #11 (2002). Introduced as a ninja-like murderer of third-string superheroes such as the suburban vigilante Buckeye, Onomatopoeia struck a more well-known superhero, the contemporary Green Arrow, Connor Hawke—an accomplished martial artist himself and son of the original Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. Like his name implies, Onomatopoeia's calling card is that he utters onomatopoeic words—specifically, the sound of the murder weapon he employs during the murder (“Bang!” “Crash!”)—just before killing his next victim. While he didn't quite execute Green Arrow, he did manage to hospitalize him by shooting him in the head. As Green Arrow's arch-nemesis—and by extension, his father's, as the two Emerald Archers fight crime together in Star City—little is known about this evasive, verbally limited supervillain. His face concealed behind a black mask with concentric bull's-eye markings, Onomatopoeia has superpowers that mimic a super–serial killer. He is adept at using guns, swords, knives, and other weaponry, and even goes to such extremes as to bite weapons in two! With behavior that borders on psychotic, the mysterious Onomatopoeia might find a welcome home in the bleaker post–Infinite Crisis (2005–2006) DC Universe.

Onomatopoeia

 

in linguistics, sound-imitative words that develop out of a phonetic similarity to combinations of nonverbal sounds—for example, Russian miaukat’, “to meow” (from miau, “meow”). The term “onomatopoeia” also refers to the method by which sound-imitative words are formed, as well as to a particular type of onomatopoeic, or reduplicative, word. Often, “onomatopoeia” designates the conventional verbal imitation of the sound associated with a living or nonliving thing (ku-ku, “cuckoo”; bum-bum, “boom-boom”; a devitsa—khi-khi-khi! da kha-kha-kha! “And the girl goes ‘Hee, hee, hee!’ and ‘Ha, ha, ha!’ “). Onomatopoeia is used in poetry to create an image based on sound:

Budu akat’, budu okat’,
Kapliu-step’ voz’mu pod lokot’,
Kon’ poidet podkovoi tsokat’,
Ekat’ selezenkoiu. (A. Tarkovskii) 

onomatopoeia

1. the formation of words whose sound is imitative of the sound of the noise or action designated, such as hiss, buzz, and bang
2. the use of such words for poetic or rhetorical effect
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References in periodicals archive ?
This might be accomplished by presenting echoic prompts with visual feedback of notes sung faded to social feedback on accuracy with increasing delays added between the echoic prompt and the sung response.
Teaching was structured by MEI (Multiple Exemplar Instruction) and intercalated with tests of the same selection, echoic and tact relations, before and after each teaching set.
Considering the studies presented, it was verified that the discussion between functional dependence and independence is complex due to the fact that many studies involve the manipulation of distinct variables and use different types of procedures, such as alternating training, echoic training and training in both operants for some items.
That is, if you have a clear understanding of stimulus control and of behavioral principles and procedures to effectively strengthen, weaken, or transfer this control, then you can arrange learning environments to generate mand, tact, echoic, and other verbal operant responses.
By echoic responses they mean "everything ranging from an exact repetition to a paraphrase" (2002: 117).
6) Radiologically, CRCC presents as a well-defined, homogeneously echoic, and hypovascular mass.
IT has often been said that English has more words than other modern languages, but when I listen to my radio I am appalled when I hear and read almost every day the constant use of what I can only describe as echoic words used for emphasis and as superlatives.
Later "mirror arias," such as Handel's "Myself I Shall Adore" from Semele (which comes dangerously close to the masturbatory pleasure posited by Amor hello specchio), frequently feature echoic vocal ornaments either as a direct invocation of the Ovidian association of Echo and Narcissus or as a musical representation of visual reflections.
Ultrasonic testing of the ingots showed that echoic discontinuities--shrinkage cavities and pores, structural non-uniformity and inclusions--were absent in them.
By "turn[ing] Echo's reverberating, disembodied voice into self expression," she writes, he "realign[s] [the voice] with her body and self, and [thus] places echoic sound within the range of male surveillance" (166).
From within the behavior analytic paradigm, they provide single-subject experimental data on how social reinforcement can increase echoic tacts.