echopraxia


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echopraxia

[‚ek·ō′prak·sē·ə]
(psychology)
Involuntary imitative repetition of the movements of another.
References in periodicals archive ?
There should be 3 or more of the following 12 findings for the diagnosis of catatonia (4) Stupor (no psychomotor activity, not actively relating to the environment) Catalepsy (passive induction of a posture held against gravity) Waxy flexibility (resistance to positioning by the examiner) Mutism (no or very little verbal response) Negativism (no response to external stimuli) Posturing (maintenance of a posture against gravity) Mannerism (caricature of normal actions) Stereotype (abnormally frequent and repetitive, non-goal-directed movements) Agitation Grimacing Echolalia (mimicking other's speech) Echopraxia (mimicking other's movements)
Despite the portrayal in the popular media, it is particularly rare to have complex tics that include copropraxia (an obscene gesture), coprolalia (an obscene movement), echolalia (repeating another's words), or echopraxia (repeating another's actions).
Various researchers, including Luria (1980), have noted perseveration, stimulus bound behavior, echopraxia, and echolalia.
Catatonia is a clinical syndrome characterized by motor inhibition, manifested by hyperkinesias or negativism, echopathy (echolalia, echopraxia, echomimia).
I often look back at this wonderful experience with appreciation because the piece I composed for that occasion, "Echopraxia", which had its premiere in Nicosia, later received many prizes including the Royal Philharmonic Society Award in London and the Irino Prize in Tokyo."
(10) Psychologists have labeled two related versions of this condition as personality disorders: echopraxia, the unconscious (unwilled) over-imitation of another's actions, and echolalia, the unconscious over-imitation of another's speech.
Complex motor tics tend to be slower and appear purposeful--for example, hopping, kissing, touching objects, echopraxia (imitating others' movements) and copropraxia (obscene gestures).
(1,2) In severe forms of 1,2 Tourette's disorder, automatic imitation of the actions of others (echolalia and echopraxia), purely involuntary, often unconscious, movements that lack pre-movement potentials on EEG and repetitive movements that satisfy an urge and stop when things feel right, can occur in the same individual.