Eclogue


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Eclogue

 

a type of idyll. An eclogue is a genre scene, usually a love scene, of conventional pastoral life. It may be written in narrative or dramatic form. In classical literature no distinction was made between the idyll, for example, those of Theocritus, and the eclogue, for example, Vergil’s Bucolics. Writers of the 18th-century classical school considered that the idyll required more emotion, and the eclogue more action; such were the first Russian eclogues, by A. P. Sumarokov. However, the distinction was not strictly observed. The genre had become obsolete by the early 19th century.

References in periodicals archive ?
The theme of revenge pervades the West Indian Eclogues, but it plays a central role in the fourth and final eclogue.
He resorted to 'May', an eclogue whose doctrinal substance is summarised in E.
Agonistic poetics and Vergil's third Eclogue. In Skoie, M & Bjornstad-Velasquez, S (eds.) Pastoral and the humanities: Arcadia reinscribed, 107-114.
The parallels between the Mosella and these passages of Garcilaso's third Eclogue will become clearer if we see them in light of Elias Rivers' study, "The Pastoral Paradox of Natural Art".
While his primary intentions with the tombeau may well have been to place himself at the head of an established Lyonnais coterie rather than to slight his fellow poets, this editorial move appears, all the same, to have been an effort by Sceve to eclipse his contemporaries, particularly the innovator of the eclogue in French (Hulubei 250).
Although scholars have focused on Encina's concerns with respect to his recognition as poet and then criticism of the Duke for his lack of recompense within the second half of the eclogue, one could argue that these concerns begin, in fact, in the opening section of the play.
(253-258) Virgil's Eclogue II is also present in the catalogue of all the possessions the affectionate shepherd says he would share with his beloved if he were willing to live with him and to be his love:
He refers to himself as the poet "who toyed with shepherds' songs" and sets his poetic "seal" or sphragis on the Georgics by making its final line repeat the first line of the Eclogues. Thus identifying himself as the author of the Eclogues, Virgil introduces the notion of a poetic career to serve as a prospective as well as retrospective framework for the Georgics.
Just as Meliboeus' words, in the memorable opening lines 3 and 4 of this Eclogue, starkly delineate Tityrus' good fortune by juxtaposing it with the catastrophe he has suffered, his words in lines 72-73 show what a 'fortunate old man' (1.46) Tityrus is to be able to keep his land.
(14) In other words, the woods (silvae) in the opening lines of Eclogue 4 may describe poetic content; but they also suggest a mode of literary production that is intimately connected to textuality.
This essay argues that Dante's resuscitation of the Virgilian pastoral in his Latin letter to the Bolognese proto-humanist Giovanni del Virgilio was the proximate model for Petrarch's own foray into the pastoral mode in the first eclogue of his Bucolicum Carmen and in the epistle that glosses it (Familiares 10.4).
NOTE: The last two lines of this poem come from Virgil's Eclogue