ecocline

ecocline

[′ek·ō‚klīn]
(ecology)
A genetic gradient of adaptability to an environmental gradient; formed by the merger of ecotypes.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Rundle, "Ecotone or Ecocline: Ecological Boundaries in
Factors affecting seasonal variations in demersal fish assemblages at an ecocline in a tropical-subtropical estuary.
manillensis but the deviation in Cytb gene sequence of Pakistani wild rose-ringed parakeets is pointing towards independent evolution of this species as an ecocline in Pakistan.
The eastern San Bernardino Mountains in southern California range from about 3003,506 m and support a wide range of as many as 11 distinct life zones along an ecocline extending from Sonoran Desert on the east side and Mojave Desert on the north side, to an alpine ecosystem near the summit (Schoenherr 1992).
Accordingly, we have named the term periodic physical forcing for the ecocline formed by the covariation of this major complex-gradient and the corresponding coenocline.
An ecocline of vegetation types for each region was developed on the basis of ecological moisture regimes.
Main corresponding vegetation types are tropical evergreen forest, mesophyll montane forest, oak forest, pine forest and oak-pine forest, with extensive ecocline zones between the contiguous types of vegetation (Martinez et al.
To appraise the disease burden at Igbo-Ora, a rural community in the forest-savannah woodland ecocline, south-west Nigeria, an integrated study on malaria immunology and parasitology was initiated in 1991; the entomology and socioeconomic components commenced in 2001.
The separations between contiguous segments of the Earth's surface are not always clear because the zone of contact between two communities may be gradual (an ecocline) or relatively abrupt (an ecotone).
In the mountains of Mexico's dry tropics gradual transitions between TDF and oak forest are common, and species of both vegetation types may coexist in ecoclines.