Ecological footprint

(redirected from ecological footprints)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Ecological footprint

Measure of the resource use by a population within a defined area of land, including imported resources.Assessment of the ecological footprints of nation-states or other defined geographic areas reveals the true environmental impact of those states and their ability to survive on their own resources in the long term. It has emerged as the world’s premier measure of humanity’s demand on nature. It measures how much land and water area a human population requires to produce the resource it consumes and to absorb its wastes, using prevailing technology.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The report also seeks to generate some preliminary perspectives on the ways in which personal lifestyles within the region influence ecological footprints. To that end, seven volunteers calculated their own personal footprints using a framework supplied by Best Foot Forward.
Ecological Footprint Quiz http://www.myfootprint.org/
The ecological footprint is a measure of human demand on the earth's ecosystems, and helps to measure land and sea area that is used to produce resources.
Many municipalities (including, for example, Toronto, Ontario and Portland, Oregon) have taken climate change initiatives that make it much easier for individuals to reduce their ecological footprints. While George W.
Our Ecological Footprint is a guidebook for and understanding using the metaphor of a footprint as a measure of our impact upon the earth.
While many countries have made concerted efforts in recent years to reduce their carbon footprint in an attempt to slow global warming, most are still consuming far more than the earth can support and thereby creating an ecological footprint that isn't sustainable.
The indicators that are used for calculating the HPI score cover life-satisfaction, life expectancy, inequality of outcomes and the ecological footprint. As argued in the report, 'GDP growth on its own does not mean a better life for everyone, particularly in countries that are already wealthy.
In order to obtain SD the countries with a very high HDI that have per capita ecological footprints close to 4.0 global hectares must reduce their per capita ecological footprint by about 40% [IEA, 2012], which is a manageable task using current knowledge and technologies.
Rapidly developing countries such as Qatar and the United Arab Emirates account for some the highest ecological footprints in the world, while poorer nations such as India and Indonesia have lower footprints that are within nature's threshold.
Countries like Kuwait, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates had the highest ecological footprints. Other countries like India and Indonesia have footprints well within the earth's carrying capacity.
The UAE has one of the highest ecological footprints per person, and results in one of the largest wastage of resources.

Full browser ?