economic sociology


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economic sociology

the sociological study of the relations between the ECONOMY and other social institutions. Rather than being a specialist area of study within the discipline, the sociological analysis of economic life has been a central concern within many forms of general sociology. It is a central concern, for example, in the work of major classical sociologists such as MARX, WEBER and DURKHEIM. More specialist areas of sociological inquiry in which economic questions are uppermost include ORGANIZATION THEORY, INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY, SOCIOLOGY OF WORK.
References in periodicals archive ?
Next to all special sociologies (RC1: military sociology, RC2: economic sociology ...
Where Bad Jobs Are Better is a well-researched and well-written book that should be of interest to students of political economy (domestic and international), economic sociology, and labor policy.
Other sociologists then review matters related to theory and methods, social processes, formal organizations, political and economic sociology, differentiation and stratification, individual and society, demography, policy, and sociology and world religions.
It is constructed through the thoughtful integration of four primary perspectives: (1) political economy and the study of power; (2) economic sociology and the question of networks; (3) human geography and the focus on space and scale; and (4) development studies and the livelihoods perspective.
Central is a conversation with recent economic sociology and anthropology that builds on Actor Network Theory (ANT).
Schumpeter discussed several, from today's standpoint, independent scientific disciplines such as economic history, statistics, theory, economic sociology, political economy, and applied fields as techniques of economic analysis.
She is interested in the intersections between economic sociology, STS and political sociology.
Specifically, as it pertains to corporate governance and agency theory, this includes not recognizing some of the most basic legal strictures or empirical research findings in management studies or economic sociology. From Styhre's viewpoint, "it would be helpful if economists committed to the mapping of economic systems would pay attention to a wider set of conditions and theories" (233).
That's what Dan Hirschman, a lecturer in economic sociology at the University of Michigan who will start work later this year as an assistant professor of sociology at Brown, proposes in a chapter, titled Rediscovering the 1%: Economic Expertise and Inequality Knowledge , of his brand spanking new Ph.D.
Scrutinizing New Institutional Economics and choosing political sociology as a framework (as opposed to developmental economics or economic sociology, for instance) also allows the book to efficiently discuss the structural and governmental problems that afflict this sector.
Or does the question touch on a bigger issue--whether the alternative to mainstream economics should be economics with non-neoclassical characteristics or a broader, interdisciplinary social science (like Marxian political economy or 'old' institutional economics shading into economic sociology)?