dysplasia

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dysplasia

[di′splā·zhə]
(pathology)
Abnormal development or growth, especially of cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
HIDROTIC ectodermal dysplasia is a congenital dystrophy of nails and hair characterised by thickened nails, sparse or absent scalp hair, and often associated with a thickening of skin on palms and soles.
The Importance of Ectodermal Dysplasia in Dental Practice
Previously, elongated, slender fingernails have only been reported in single patients with either Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, (11) hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, (13) or Marfan syndrome.
The association of ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and clefting with or without cleft palate is characterized as EEC syndrome [3].
Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, which means abnormal growth of the ectoderm, including an inability to sweat, appears mainly in men.
Even though I accept their apology, I still hope that they donate to my cause or other organizations that connect with ectodermal dysplasia.
In addition to also suffering from a severe case of Ectodermal Dysplasia, Matti has a cleft palate, lack of tear ducts, missing fingers, and is hearing impaired.
Preliminary trials of signaling factor supplementation with animals that have ectodermal dysplasia appear promising, while treatment options for the other genetic disorders still must be elucidated.
The Lower Hopton Junior and Infant School pupil is one of eight people in the UK and 30 worldwide known to suffer from Hay-Wells syndrome, a type of Ectodermal Dysplasia.
CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts and BOTHELL, Washington, September 9, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Edimer Pharmaceuticals and CMC Biologics today announce the execution of a manufacturing contract to support the development of EDI200, a clinical-stage recombinant protein for the treatment of X-linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia (XLHED), a rare genetic disease with orphan designation in the USA and Europe.
As described in an article published in the July/August issue of Compendium of Continuing Education in Dentistry, the patient presented with a rare, multifactoral hereditary disorder called ectodermal dysplasia, or ED.