ectomycorrhizae


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ectomycorrhizae

[‚ek·tō·mī′kȯr·ə‚zī]
(ecology)
A type of mycorrhizae composed of a fungus sheath around the outside of root tips, with individual hyphae penetrating between the cortical cells of the root to absorb photosynthates.
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Chloropicrin did not adversely affect the (1998), USA formation of ectomycorrhizae on young Douglas fir seedlings by naturally occurring fungi for up to 5 years following treatment Ingham and Thies Limited effects on fungal biomass and (1996), USA amoebae were found, but no major impact on the soil food web Spokas et al.
Comparisons of ectomycorrhizae on pinyon pines (Pinus edulis; Pinaceae) across extremes on soil type and herbivory.
Ectomycorrhizae as biological deterrents to pathogenic root infections.
Pine trees cannot survive without ectomycorrhizae, while members of the mustard family are often parasitized by mycorrhizal fungi.
Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization on growth and formation of ectomycorrhizae of Quercus alba and Q.
In an earlier study, a positive association was found between infection by ectomycorrhizae and seedling establishment success, but the only positive benefit to seedlings appeared to be greater water status, with no apparent benefit to seedling photosynthesis or growth (Hasselquist et al.
Differences in utilisation of organic P by ryegrass and pine seedlings may be linked to different types of mycorrhizal associations, because ryegrass is associated with vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizae (VAM) (Powell 1977), whereas roots of radiata pine seedlings are associated with ectomycorrhizae (ECM) (Chu-Chou and Grace 1979).
Hartig net structure of ectomycorrhizae synthesized between Laccaria bicolor (Tricholomataceae) and two hosts: Betula alleghaniensis (Betulaceae) and Pinus resinosa (Pinaceae).
Mycorrhizae are formed with the roots of most vascular plants, taking the form of ectomycorrhizae (characterised by dense mycelial sheaths around the roots and intercellular hyphal invasion of the root cortex), which are mostly limited to temperate forest trees, or endomycorrhizae (characterised by external hyphal networks in the soil and extensive growth of arbuscles (and commonly vesicles) within the root cortex cells of the host), which are formed by nearly all other plants.
The digging made by bettongs tends to be clumped together and are most dense within 2 m of trees that host ectomycorrhizae, rather than in the spaces between trees (Johnson 1994).
Negative effects of scale insects herbivory on the ectomycorrhizae of juvenile pinyon pine.