ectotherm

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ectotherm

[′ek·tə‚thərm]
(physiology)
An animal that obtains most of its heat from the environment and therefore has a body temperature very close to that of its environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
The resting and exhaustion lactate concentrations reported in Table 1 are about half of those measured in spiders (Prestwich 1983a; Anderson & Prestwich 1985), terrestrial crabs (Full & Herreid 1984; Full 1987) and terrestrial ectothermic vertebrates (Bennett 1978).
Increases in body size of ectothermic animals grown at lower temperatures are taxonomically pervasive and well documented (e.
Ectothermic dinosaurs could not have kept their bodies warm enough, says Robert Bakker of the University of Colorado, who is one of the most vocal proponents of warm-blooded dinosaurs.
The influence of temperature on cell size would tend to produce larger cells in ectothermic animals living at higher latitudes.
Even some ectothermic insects are able to maintain higher temperatures as a consequence of grouping.
We propose that abundances of lizards were similar in mixed stands and in monotypic stands of nonnative saltcedars because structural requirements that provide sunlight and shade needed for small ectothermic organisms to thermoregulate were met (Waldschmidt, 1980; Adolph, 1990) in all but the most shaded habitats typical of dense monotypic stands of saltcedars.
The data set includes 133 estimates of heritability for endothermic vertebrates, 12 for ectothermic vertebrates, and 20 for invertebrates.
To deal with exposure to temperatures <0[degrees]C, some species of ectothermic reptiles are capable of freeze avoidance, freeze tolerance, or both.
2010) suggests that ectothermic organisms with high metabolic rates, such as cephalopods, may have a pre-adaptive capacity for resilience in the face of decreasing ocean pH.
For ectothermic animals, such as fruit flies, one refers to standard metabolic rate, which is strongly influenced by environmental temperature.
In several ectothermic species, egg size in natural populations increases in colder areas and at colder times: for example, in crustaceans (Green 1966; Kerfoot 1974; Brambilla 1982; Clarke et al.
The complementary hypothesis--that dark shells should be advantageous in cool conditions by helping to warm these ectothermic animals--also receives minimal support (Jones, 1973; Phifer-Rixey et al, 2008).