ecumenical

(redirected from ecumenicalism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

ecumenical

, oecumenical, ecumenic, oecumenic
1. of or relating to the Christian Church throughout the world, esp with regard to its unity
2. 
a. tending to promote unity among Churches
b. of or relating to the international movement initiated among non-Catholic Churches in 1910 aimed at Christian unity: embodied, since 1937, in the World Council of Churches
http://ecumenism.net/
References in periodicals archive ?
O'NEILL, supra note 14; Kersch, Ecumenicalism through Constitutionalism, supra note 162.
Contemporary gurus have popularized hallmark Vedic maxims of universalism and ecumenicalism, such as "ekam sat vipraha bahudha vadanti" or "Truth is one, the wise call it by many names" (Rg Veda, 1.
The verses in question tell us nothing about events after the death of the Prophet, and it has to be said that the Medinese suras of which they form a part are not suggestive of ecumenicalism.
Augustine's ecumenicalism is particularly evident in his Contra Faustum.
Similarly, whereas Pope John Paul I, by virtue of convening an ecumenical council in the 1960's, could be considered an advocate for ecumenicalism, an article discussing the current Pope's attitude towards the perceived superiority of the Roman Catholic Church made the following statement: "Pope Benedict XVI has ignited controversy across the world by approving a document saying non-Catholic Christian communities are either defective or not true churches, and the Roman Catholic Church provides the only true path to salvation (WorldNetDaily, July 11, 2007).
In keeping with this philosophical ecumenicalism, I will leave it an open question what sort of further explanation or justification our concerns themselves admit of.
Wright, has been the decline of ecumenicalism in the celebration of Rev.
43) This ecumenicalism was encouraged by British atrocities such as the events in Punjab in 1919, when the colonial government opened fire on peaceful protestors, killing many and imprisoning many more on sedition charges.
Cardinal Goncalves Cerejeira--a regular voice for the ecumenicalism presumed under Portuguese imperialism--infused this element of piety into the imperialist impulse in Portuguese history, contending that "the true motivation behind the Portuguese expansion" resided solely in the "humane and Christian character" of the nation.
The movement, which has no sympathy for ecumenicalism, stresses the final authority of the Bible, the need for revival and the centrality of personal conversion.
Is it too elitist to wonder whether concentrating on writers few readers or even fellow congressists have heard of is ecumenicalism gone off the rails?