ecumenical

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ecumenical

, oecumenical, ecumenic, oecumenic
1. of or relating to the Christian Church throughout the world, esp with regard to its unity
2. 
a. tending to promote unity among Churches
b. of or relating to the international movement initiated among non-Catholic Churches in 1910 aimed at Christian unity: embodied, since 1937, in the World Council of Churches
http://ecumenism.net/
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(164.) Kersch, Ecumenicalism through Constitutionalism, supra note 162, at 89-93.
For this reason, ideological flexibility and a limited political ecumenicalism that allowed space for multiple ideologies under a larger tent (like Zionism) was necessary in ways difficult to comprehend from a Central European perspective.
While wine is still very much a part of the festival with 29 wineries represented this year, over the years an International Food Court was added - and, in a show of ecumenicalism, a beer garden.
A testament to the value of ecumenicalism and interdisciplinary inquiry, Thinking the Twentieth Century is a celebration of the life of the mind, well lived.
Many may still be unaware, due to his low-key and unassuming nature, that the Archbishop comes from a Roman Catholic and Church of England family - something which informed his belief in ecumenicalism.
The verses in question tell us nothing about events after the death of the Prophet, and it has to be said that the Medinese suras of which they form a part are not suggestive of ecumenicalism. They are full of bitterly hostile polemics against Jews and Christians, both of whom are charged with polytheism, deification of their own leaders, deification of themselves, and more besides.
Augustine's ecumenicalism is particularly evident in his Contra Faustum.
From his use of military chaplains, to his impatience with the claims of the religiously scrupulous to avoid military service, to his initial support of tax subsidies for Virginia churches, to his manner of addressing religious groups and the wider public with pious but nonsectarian rhetoric, we can see that Washington followed a policy of "ecumenicalism," but one that subordinated the claims of conscience to the claims of good republican citizenship.
Similarly, whereas Pope John Paul I, by virtue of convening an ecumenical council in the 1960's, could be considered an advocate for ecumenicalism, an article discussing the current Pope's attitude towards the perceived superiority of the Roman Catholic Church made the following statement: "Pope Benedict XVI has ignited controversy across the world by approving a document saying non-Catholic Christian communities are either defective or not true churches, and the Roman Catholic Church provides the only true path to salvation (WorldNetDaily, July 11, 2007).
In keeping with this philosophical ecumenicalism, I will leave it an open question what sort of further explanation or justification our concerns themselves admit of.
So let me say in general terms that Bains has provided in the area of philosophy the single most outstanding example I have seen of the "ecumenicalism in semiotics" that Prof.