eddy

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eddy

a movement in a stream of air, water, or other fluid in which the current doubles back on itself causing a miniature whirlwind or whirlpool

Eddy

Mary Baker. 1821--1910, US religious leader; founder of the Christian Science movement (1866)

eddy

[′ed·ē]
(fluid mechanics)
A vortexlike motion of a fluid running contrary to the main current.

eddy

eddy
i. A local irregularity in wind-producing gusts and lulls. Small-scale eddies produce turbulent conditions.
ii. The more or less circular motion produced by an obstruction in the path of moving fluid, such as against a streamlined flow on an uneven or nonstreamlined surface or in an area where there is a sudden rise in pressure. In fluids, any circulation drawing its energy from a flow of a much larger scale and brought about by pressure irregularities.
References in classic literature ?
In this manner they proceeded, for many rods, in a silence that was only interrupted by the rippling of the water, as its eddies played around them, or the low dash made by their own cautious footsteps.
There would he be seen, at all times and in all weathers, sometimes in his skiff, anchored among the eddies, or prowling like a shark about some wreck, where the fish are supposed to be most abundant; sometimes seated on a rock from hour to hour, looking, in the mist and drizzle, like a solitary heron watching for its prey.
But immense volumes of smoke at that moment rolled over their heath, and, whirling in the eddies formed by the mountains, interposed a barrier to their sight, while he was speaking.
His only aspirations were to hold out at poker, at his club, to know the names of all the cocottes, to shake hands all round, to ply his rosy gullet with truffles and champagne, and to create uncomfortable eddies and obstructions among the constituent atoms of the American colony.
There was no escaping the swift procession or the leisurely lunch, where talk came and went in low-voiced eddies that had the village for their centre.
The humming of the gnats that danced above the eddies of the stream, the beating of the dragon flies' wings, the strokes of the water spiders' legs, like oars which had lifted their boat -- all these made audible music.
But at sunset the clouds gathered again, bringing an earlier night, and the snow began to fall straight and steadily from a sky without wind, in a soft universal diffusion more confusing than the gusts and eddies of the morning.
Now we could hear the water rushing past the port-holes, and in the dim light that filtered through them to the water beyond the swirling eddies were plainly visible.
The clouds are dangerous for us; they contain opposing currents which might catch us in their eddies, and lightnings that might set on fire.
Let the reader picture to himself now, this immense, oblong hall, illuminated by the pallid light of a January day, invaded by a motley and noisy throng which drifts along the walls, and eddies round the seven pillars, and he will have a confused idea of the whole effect of the picture, whose curious details we shall make an effort to indicate with more precision.
The breeze upset them, the eddies near the ground upset them, a passing thought in the mind of the aeronaut upset them.
The eddies seemed to circle faster and faster, until the music wrought itself into a crash, ceased, and the circles were smashed into little separate bits.