eddy

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eddy

a movement in a stream of air, water, or other fluid in which the current doubles back on itself causing a miniature whirlwind or whirlpool

Eddy

Mary Baker. 1821--1910, US religious leader; founder of the Christian Science movement (1866)

eddy

[′ed·ē]
(fluid mechanics)
A vortexlike motion of a fluid running contrary to the main current.

eddy

eddy
i. A local irregularity in wind-producing gusts and lulls. Small-scale eddies produce turbulent conditions.
ii. The more or less circular motion produced by an obstruction in the path of moving fluid, such as against a streamlined flow on an uneven or nonstreamlined surface or in an area where there is a sudden rise in pressure. In fluids, any circulation drawing its energy from a flow of a much larger scale and brought about by pressure irregularities.
References in periodicals archive ?
This happens very slowly but, over the next 1,000 years, much of the fossil fuel carbon emissions will end up in the deep ocean; ocean eddies make that happen.
The team used deep-sea moorings, current meters and sediment traps to gather six months' worth of data on eddies over the East Pacific Rise and then plugged the results into a series of computer models.
These eddies are small cogs in a big turning wheel," Bower said.
To balance the budget, some researchers have pointed to the immense biomass generated in large ocean eddies (SN: 6/14/03, p.
What is being slowly learned about ocean eddies suggests that they are dynamic ecosystems in themselves, and have fundamental influences on fisheries and related ocean habitats that they sweep past.
The Gold Eddie Award for superior editorial excellence was accepted by Macworld's Editorial Director, Jason Snell at the 2005 Folio Awards Gala Tuesday evening in New York City, held in conjunction with the annual Folio: Show magazine conference.
Researchers created a new mathematical model that showed that "boundaries of water-carrying eddies satisfy the same type of differential equations that the area surrounding black holes do in general relativity," explains ETH Zurich's George Haller, the study's lead author.
In wires such as the Oak Ridge prototype, structural irregularities in the ceramic coating can preserve superconductivity by holding the eddies in place.
He had the clever idea that eddies were perturbing the layers of the water column, mixing different waters, and bringing nutrients up from below.
What's more, eddies can influence weather across a wide region, and their currents can have effects ranging from disrupting operations at deep-sea oil platforms to influencing the outcomes of long-distance yacht races.
From 1989 to 1992 we were able to track six retroflection eddies for the first time using surface drifters and subsurface floats that were trapped in the eddies' closed circulation and looped in them for as long as five months.
A comb inserted through the film induces swirling eddies downstream, which a digital camera records through a 5-centimeter-square window.