eddy flux

eddy flux

[′ed·ē ‚fləks]
(fluid mechanics)
The rate of transport (or flux) of fluid properties such as momentum, mass heat, or suspended matter by means of eddies in a turbulent motion; the rate of turbulent exchange. Also known as moisture flux; turbulent flux.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Running et al., "Evaluation of remote sensing based terrestrial productivity from MODIS using regional tower eddy flux network observations," IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol.
Previous analyses of eddy flux data in coastal wetlands revealed that tidal inundation significantly suppressed ecosystem respiration in spring tides comparing to neap tides [18, 19].
Two eddy flux towers in mangrove forests were established in southern China in late 2008 or early 2009 to monitor vertical net ecosystem carbon or water exchange.
9, adapted from Li and von Storch 2013), suggesting that classical parameterizations significantly underestimate the total eddy flux. The fluctuating part, even though having zero mean, can play an important role in generating large-scale, low-frequency variations and in shaping the mean oceanic circulation.
(a) Amplitude of fluctuations of the eddy forcing as measured by the standard deviation of divergence of eddy flux in a 1/10[degrees] ocean GCM.
The whole premise behind a project like the Lake Taihu Eddy Flux Network (Xuhui Lee et al., p.
To date, some progress has been made toward answering the first science question, using data from a subset of the eddy flux sites (Deng et al.
Currently, the Lake Taihu Eddy Flux Network consists of five lake sites and one land site (Fig.
Additionally, eddy covariance sites often show an energy imbalance between the sum of eddy fluxes of sensible and latent heat and the available energy, which can have implications for the inferred C[O.sub.2] fluxes (e.g., Wilson et al.
For instance, higher values of turbulent eddy fluxes can be identified over forested areas characterized by higher sensible heat fluxes.