eddy heat flux

eddy heat flux

[′ed·ē ′hēt ‚fləks]
(thermodynamics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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As the eddy heat flux ([bar.v'T']) can well represent the vertical flux of wave activity well [44], we examine the trends of eddy heat flux in DJF during the two periods (Figure 7).
Caption: Figure 7: Trends in the eddy heat flux (units: Km [s.sup.-1]/decade) derived from the CCMs' ensemble mean in DJF over the periods (a, b) 1960-2000 and (c, d) 2001-2050, in the SH ((a) and (c)) and NH ((b) and (d)).
Figure 5(a) shows the difference in poleward eddy heat flux at 850 hPa in December between the MOD and CTL runs (former minus latter).
Figure 11 shows the composite differences in the 850 hPa poleward eddy heat flux and the LDR between the MOD and CTL runs (former minus latter) based on the three cases.
Figure 14 shows the differences in cyclone track frequency, the 850 hPa poleward eddy heat flux, and the LDR between the SS and CTL runs (former minus latter).
The MOD run also exhibits decreases in the cyclone track frequency, the 850 hPa poleward eddy heat flux, and the local deepening rate (LDR), which are appropriate measures of synoptic-scale cyclone activity, in the regions downstream of the Changbai Mountain, concurrent with the weakened lower-tropospheric baroclinic zone (LTBZ).
Caption: Figure 11: (a) Composite differences in the 850 hPa poleward eddy heat flux between the MOD and CTL runs (former minus latter) based on the three typical cases.
SB1 shows the 3D distribution of the relative soil saturation along with the turbulent eddy heat fluxes. A clear spatial structure can be observed at the land surface, with topographic convergent zones (i.e., river corridors) experiencing higher saturation values.