eddy viscosity

eddy viscosity

[‚ed·ē vi′skäs·əd·ē]
(fluid mechanics)
The turbulent transfer of momentum by eddies giving rise to an internal fluid friction, in a manner analogous to the action of molecular viscosity in laminar flow, but taking place on a much larger scale.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Different hypotheses offered thus far have emphasized different physical processes: diurnal oscillations in eddy viscosity, diurnal changes in temperature fields over sloping terrain, the blocking of the large-scale flow by the Rocky Mountains.
In the standard k-[epsilon] model, the eddy viscosity is determined from a single turbulence length scale, whereas in reality all scales of motion will contribute to the turbulent diffusion.
This seems to be the consequence of the eddy viscosity modelling approach that predicts lower k at locally lower velocity gradients.
The turbulent kinetic energy k and the eddy viscosity [[mu].sub.t] are determined by adding to (1) and (2) two or more additional equations [48].
As the continuing theoretical progress and from a practical standpoint, many scholars recognize that whether a turbulence model can predict turbulent structures relies on the available eddy viscosity level when using the eddy viscous method.
Taking consideration of local eddy-viscosity and near wall behaviours, the wall-adapting local eddy viscosity model is used.
According to the Boussinesq eddy viscosity assumption (Boussinesq, 1877), the logarithmic law for velocity profile was solved by using the mixing length method (Prandtl, 1925; Khan et al., 2017; Zawar et al., 2017).
The sub-grid scale (SGS) eddy viscosity [v.sub.SGS] in Eq.
[9.] Basara, B.: "An Eddy Viscosity Transport Model Based on Elliptic Relaxation Approach", AIAA Journal, Vol.
Zhu, "A new k-[epsilon] eddy viscosity model for high reynolds number turbulent flows," Computers and Fluids, vol.
Where U, is the incident flow velocity, L is the diameter (~24 km for EI), and [v.sub.e]is the eddy viscosity coefficient.