editor

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editor

1. Films
a. a person who makes a selection and arrangement of individual shots in order to construct the flowing sequence of images for a film
b. a device for editing film, including a viewer and a splicer
2. a computer program that facilitates the deletion or insertion of data within information already stored in a computer
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

editor

(application)
A program used to edit a document.

Different types of document have different editors, e.g. a text editor for text files, an image editor for images, an HTML editor for web pages, etc. The term can be used for pretty much any kind of data modification, e.g. a disk sector editor which operates directly on the hard disk, bypassing the filesystem.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

linker

A utility program that connects a compiled or assembled program to a particular environment. Also known as a "link editor," the linker unites references between program modules and libraries of subroutines. Its output is a load module, which is executable code ready to run in the computer. See executable code and bind.

text editor

Software used to create and edit files that contain only text; for example, batch files, address lists and source language programs. Text editors produce raw ASCII or EBCDIC text files, and unlike word processors, they may not support formatting (word wrap, fonts, bold, italic, etc.).

Editors that are part of a development environment are designed for writing source code and provide automatic indention and multiple windows into the same file. They also display reserved words of a particular programming language in bold or in a different typeface, and any of these layout codes that are embedded in the file are bypassed when the program is compiled. See source code editor and hex editor.
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References in periodicals archive ?
All things touched or ignored during the days of his editorship, as our lives and actions during the late sixties and early seventies in the U.S., were or became unmistakably political.
I was living in Los Angeles and he invited me to come to New York to take over the editorship of Artforum.
"His editorship of the Daily Mail was a low-point in journalistic ethics.
The slide accelerated under the editorship of Andrew Sullivan.
She resigned from the editorship of Y Faner a few days before her untimely death in May 1982.
I would like to congratulate Peter Davey on his long and successful tenure of the editorship of The Architectural Review and wish him well for the future.
This illustrated, comprehensive, and critical edition of Henry VIII is part of the Arden Shakespeare-Third Series, under the general editorship of Richard Proudfoot, Ann Thompson, and David Scott Kastan.
It's back to Boston for Paul Van Slambrouck, who takes over the editorship of the Christian Science Monitor after serving the last four years as San Francisco bureau chief.
Du Bois were among the most important influences on Richardson's life." Such was the case: In 1919, only three years after viewing Rachel, The Crisis, under the editorship of Du Bois, published the first of Richardson's six essays on the theatre.
He demonstrated an unselfish commitment to the long-term future of newspapers when he turned a golden career opportunity the offered editorship of The Miami Herald into an investment in new journalists, better staff pay, and a bigger news hole that will go a long way towards transforming the San Antonio Express- News into a top-notch paper.
His continued editorship will drive up our sales even further.