eduction

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eduction

[ē′dək·shən]
(cell and molecular biology)
Loss of host genetic material when the plasmid that had been integrated into the host chromosome exits.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Educe Group is a consulting firm that specializes in the implementation and adoption of innovative and promising Talent Management software, specifically learning, performance, compensation, talent and compliance technologies.
There are less socially acceptable advantages to the night shift, quite the best of which is sleeping late in the morning and the look of horror that it educes when first people find out.
The great value of the work is that it educes from these three different eschatological perspectives of the last 100 years, a series of questions that each type has tried to answer.
For example, in both Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Richard Wright's Native Son, he educes from the transcriptions of the protagonists' consciousnesses as the pattern of a journey "expressed as a metaphor that reveals the central character's deepest promptings.
This offering is said to allow the company to lengthen its debt maturities at the same time it: educes its long-term interest costs.
n addition using low rolling esistance tyres further educes CO2 emissions by g/km.
This not only creates added comfort for tenants, but also significantly educes operating costs.
The book educes a wealth of new material, the most important of which is undoubtedly the recounting of Wescott's involvement in the 1950's with Alfred Kinsey's Institute for Sex Research.
Defending American Jewry against what has become a somewhat commonplace and unjust criticism of Jewish involvement in African American affairs--that the Jews sought to "whiten" or at least Americanize themselves through such involvement--Forman educes the internal, historical, and Judaic logic of the Jewish commitment to black causes only to then once again interrogate Jewish motives, this time from the perspective of Jewish self-exploitation rather than anything directed against blacks.
For example, the volume's editor, de Armas, educes a number of parallels between Philip and the plays medieval monarch, Sancho IV, in the service of a convincing argument that such analogies amount to a veiled critique of Philip for his amorous libertinage and for his possible complicity in the murder of a critic of his amorous adventuring.
Benson also suggests, however, that specific examples of independent women Vives educes may have subverted his end (176-77) and notes that Hyrde, Vives' English translator, extended the possibility of openness Vives unwittingly provided (179).