efflorescence

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efflorescence:

see hydratehydrate
, chemical compound that contains water. A common hydrate is the familiar blue vitriol, a crystalline form of cupric sulfate. Chemically, it is cupric sulfate pentahydrate, CuSO4·5H2O.
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Efflorescence

A deposit, usually white, formed on the surface of a brick, block, or concrete wall; it consists of salts leached from the surface of the wall.

efflorescence

[‚ef·lə′res·əns]
(botany)
The period or process of flowering.
(chemistry)
The property of hydrated crystals to lose water of hydration and crumble when exposed to air.
(materials)
A crust of salts, usually white, that forms on the surface of stone, brick, plaster, or mortar because of leaching of free alkalies from adjacent concrete or mortar.
(mineralogy)
A whitish powder, consisting of one or several minerals produced as an encrustation on the surface of a rock in an arid region. Also known as bloom.

efflorescence

An encrustation of soluble salts, commonly white, deposited on the surface of stone, brick, plaster, or mortar; usually caused by free alkalies leached from mortar or adjacent concrete as moisture moves through it.

efflorescence

1. Chem Geology
a. the process of efflorescing
b. the powdery substance formed as a result of this process, esp on the surface of rocks
2. any skin rash or eruption
References in periodicals archive ?
These higher concentrations were due to the fresh snow melting over efflorescences that had quickly formed through evaporation from the thin thawed layer on the previously snow-free sections of the plots.
Moreover, because the vast majority of efflorescences in lower Hot Weather Creek and the Slidre River area are associated with fine-grained marine sediments, it can be inferred that the results from A1 are applicable to these sites.
The majority of salt efflorescences in lower Hot Weather Creek and the Slidre River are related to geomorphic disturbance.
The ecological impact of such high rates of solute transport from the entire landscape would be considerable, since all areas of drainage concentration would have the potential to develop efflorescences.
Salt efflorescences in the lower Hot Weather Creek area on Ellesmere Island cover significant parts of the terrain below marine limit.
Efflorescences are common on disturbed terrain because surface erosion lowers the permafrost table, allowing the release of soluble materials previously held in saline permafrost.