efflorescence

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Related to efflorescent: deliquescent

efflorescence:

see hydratehydrate
, chemical compound that contains water. A common hydrate is the familiar blue vitriol, a crystalline form of cupric sulfate. Chemically, it is cupric sulfate pentahydrate, CuSO4·5H2O.
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Efflorescence

A deposit, usually white, formed on the surface of a brick, block, or concrete wall; it consists of salts leached from the surface of the wall.

efflorescence

[‚ef·lə′res·əns]
(botany)
The period or process of flowering.
(chemistry)
The property of hydrated crystals to lose water of hydration and crumble when exposed to air.
(materials)
A crust of salts, usually white, that forms on the surface of stone, brick, plaster, or mortar because of leaching of free alkalies from adjacent concrete or mortar.
(mineralogy)
A whitish powder, consisting of one or several minerals produced as an encrustation on the surface of a rock in an arid region. Also known as bloom.

efflorescence

An encrustation of soluble salts, commonly white, deposited on the surface of stone, brick, plaster, or mortar; usually caused by free alkalies leached from mortar or adjacent concrete as moisture moves through it.

efflorescence

1. Chem Geology
a. the process of efflorescing
b. the powdery substance formed as a result of this process, esp on the surface of rocks
2. any skin rash or eruption
References in periodicals archive ?
All the comedians, with the exception of the efflorescent Peter Kay, were below par.
embraces the doctrinally homogenizing, inferential, efflorescent scientia of the baroque Thomist commentators and eschews what he regards to be the speculatively inferior, historical contextualization of Aquinas's thought by 20th-century scholars (16; 213 n.
Consumption of smokeless tobacco in the form of chewing and alcoholic beverage, "toddy" derived from the efflorescent spathe of the coconut palm is widely prevalent among the Nicobarese tribe.
Their respective works may be considered representative of an efflorescent development in the popular seventeenth-century religious culture of sixteenth-century Protestant doctrinal formulations of the sacramental presence of Christ.