effort

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effort

Physics an applied force acting against inertia
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Relations among positive parenting, children's effortful control, and externalizing problems: a three-wave longitudinal study.
The protocol commenced with the maximum anterior isometric pressure task (AMAX) and then proceeded to one of four randomly assigned sequences for the collection of regular effort saliva swallows (RESS), effortful saliva swallows (ESS), maximum posterior isometric pressures (PMAX), and discrete water swallows (i.e., single sips of ~8-10 mL taken from a cup).
We just have to observe, capture and take up the back breaking effortful journey to translate it on paper.
"He turned something that was boring and required extreme effortful attention to something that was interesting that required just fascination," Dr.
The new website was developed over the past four months by the Group's marketing team, with effortful to develop the site's updated look and feel, with compelling graphics, clean navigational scheme and much more.
Task instructions for the following comparator tasks are detailed in Table 1: anterior-emphasis half-maximum tongue-palate press (AHMAX), posterior-emphasis maximum isometric tongue-palate press (PMAXTP), posterior-emphasis half-maximum tongue-palate press (PHMAX), noneffortful saliva swallow (NESS) [13,15], and effortful saliva swallow (ESS) [13,15].
Pokharel termed that Maoist movement was merely a problem and clarified that the government was effortful to resolve the deadlock on the basis of constitutional procedures after forging national consensus.
This study is the first to use virtual-reality technology on a series of clinical patients to make hypnotic analgesia less effortful for patients and to increase the efficiency of hypnosis by eliminating the need for the presence of a trained clinician.
Splaying open the ribs or letting them slouch--even if it feels comfortable--can throw off your line and make your movement more effortful than it needs to be.
In "Fruit Flies of the Moral Mind," he argues that moral judgment is a complex interplay between intuitive emotional responses and more effortful cognitive processes.