egest


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egest

[ē′jest]
(physiology)
To discharge indigestible matter from the digestive tract.
To rid the body of waste.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The difference between the number of seeds ingested and the number voided (egested) was considered to be the number of seeds that the worm had digested.
(1) My earlier work on origin of planetary systems, which similarly proposed that planetary materials were egested from the Sun, gave me the privilege of responding to Kompanichenko's brilliant work.
This difference in mechanism of nutrient balance is important because excreted nutrients are in immediately available chemical forms whereas egested nutrients must undergo further processing before algal uptake, and may be more important to benthic than pelagic processing.
They determined that, although biodeposits from a single size class can be assigned to the individual mussel that egested it, the variations in biodeposit morphology from a single mussel are greater than the variations between mussels.
It is so thick and slippery that it falls off the skin or egested by our digestive tract without being absorbed.
A smaller bit is being egested with no alterations, whereas the greater part is eliminated in the form of metabolites, through urine [7].
Within Proteobacteria, the gut digesta (61-70%), egested fecal pellets (52-87%), and tank water (36%) were dominated by class Gammaproteobacteria; the pharynx tissue (31-45%) and feed (24%) by class Alphaproteobacteria; and the gut tissue by Epsilonproteobacteria (96-99%).
At saturation and beyond, the ingested food may exceed stomach capacity; partial digestion may occur before the food is diverted to the midgut and egested as feces, leading to reduced absorption efficiency (e.g., Winter 1974, Widdows et al.
Transmission to healthy plants occurs when the infected vector feeds and egests the bacterium into the plant's xylem.
Both beverages have their exclusive, expensive variants, such as Kopi leak, made from the seeds of coffee berries once they have been eaten and egested by the Asian palm civet, which reaches retail prices of $700 per kilogramme.
Food needs to be ingested, digested and egested via their siphons.