strength

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strength

[streŋkth]
(acoustics)
The maximum instantaneous rate of volume displacement produced by a sound source when emitting a wave with sinusoidal time variation.
(mechanics)
The stress at which material ruptures or fails.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

strength

Of a material, the capability of the material to resist physical forces imposed on it.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Strength

See also Brawniness.
Strife (See DISCORD.)
Stubbornness (See OBSTINACY.)
acorn
heraldic symbol of strength. [Heraldry: Jobes, 27]
Atlas
Titan condemned to bear heavens on shoulders. [Gk. Myth.: Walsh Classical, 38]
Atlas, Charles
(1892–1972) 20th-century strongman; went from “98-pound weakling” to “world’s strongest man.” [Am. Sports: Amory, 38–39]
Babe
Paul Bunyan’s blue ox; straightens roads by pulling them. [Am. Lit.: Fisher, 270]
Bionic Man
superman of the technological age. [TV: “The Six Million Dollar Man” in Terrace, II: 294–295]
buffalo
heraldic symbol of power. [Heraldry: Halberts, 21]
Bunyan, Paul
legendary woodsman of prodigious strength. [Am. Folklore: Paul Bunyan]
Cyclopes
one-eyed giants; builders of fortifications. [Gk. Myth.: Avery, 346]
Hercules
his twelve labors revealed his godlike powers. [Rom. Myth.: Howe, 122]
Katinka, the Powerful
a female Man Mountain Dean. [Am. Comics: “Toonerville Folks” in Horn, 668]
Little John
oak of a man in Robin Hood’s band. [Br. Lit.: Robin Hood]
meginjardir
Thor’s belt; doubled his power. [Norse Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 1076]
Milo of Croton
renowned athlete. [Gk. Myth.: Hall, 209]
Polydamas
huge athlete who killed a fierce lion with his bare hands, stopped a rushing chariot, lifted a mad bull, and died attempting to stop a falling rock. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 801]
Samson
possessed extraordinary might which derived from hair. [O.T.: Judges 16:17]
Superman
caped superhero and modern-day Hercules. [Comics: Horn, 642–643]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The interrelationships of ego strength, self-esteem, death anxiety, and gender in undergraduate college students.
The Barron Ego Strength Scale: A study of personality correlates among normals.
Ego virtues were assessed by the Psychosocial Inventory of Ego Strengths (PIES; Markstrom et al., 1997).
It was hypothesized that social relationships (with faculty and fellow students) would predict identity achievement/diffusion, identity achievement/diffusion would predict ego strengths, and ego strengths would predict academic outcomes.
While the student relationships variable was not associated with identity achievement or diffusion, student relationships were indirectly related to academic outcomes through the ego strengths. This result may reflect the more proximal nature of student relationships to individuals' daily lives.
The question must be asked as to why results would suggest that student relationships are associated with ego strengths but not with identity achievement or diffusion.
One of the first and most glaring measures of the new client's ego strength is the way in which he/she responds to the inner child encountered in age regression.
The therapist or a group therapy member can provide that transitional corrective experience, lending ego strengths to the client's underdeveloped reality ego, which in turn is utilized as the "good enough" parent to re-parent the child ego state (Dungee-Anderson, 1992).
These were Hs (Hypochondriasis), r = .30, p [less than] .01; Hy (Hysteria), r = .25, p [less than] .05; Pd (Psychopathic Deviate), r = .23,p [less than] .05; Pa (Paranoid), r = .28, p [less than] .01; Ma (Hypomania), r = .26, p [less than] .05; R (Repression), r = -.25, p [less than] .05; RE (Social Responsibility), r = -.25, p [less than] .05; MAS (Manifest Anxiety), r = .22, p [less than] .05; ES (Ego Strength), r = -.25, p [less than] .05; MAC (McAndrew Alcoholism), r = .30, p [less than] .01.
Broadly stated, the "crisis" symptoms, as formulated by Erikson and as captured in the IEC factor, include reduced Ego Strength (negative loading of the Ego Strength scale), impulsivity and acting-out (positive loadings of Psychopathic Deviate, Hypomania, and McAndrew Alcoholism), heightened physical and somatic complaints (positive loading of Hypochondriasis and Hysteria).
The associations among the factor scores are all in the hypothesized direction, with only Ego Strength showing a negative association, as predicted.
Consistent with Erikson's assertions, the IEC factor isolated in this study suggests that identity exploration is associated with a decline in ego strength, and with symptoms related to the use of ego defenses.