strength

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strength

[streŋkth]
(acoustics)
The maximum instantaneous rate of volume displacement produced by a sound source when emitting a wave with sinusoidal time variation.
(mechanics)
The stress at which material ruptures or fails.

strength

Of a material, the capability of the material to resist physical forces imposed on it.

Strength

See also Brawniness.
Strife (See DISCORD.)
Stubbornness (See OBSTINACY.)
acorn
heraldic symbol of strength. [Heraldry: Jobes, 27]
Atlas
Titan condemned to bear heavens on shoulders. [Gk. Myth.: Walsh Classical, 38]
Atlas, Charles
(1892–1972) 20th-century strongman; went from “98-pound weakling” to “world’s strongest man.” [Am. Sports: Amory, 38–39]
Babe
Paul Bunyan’s blue ox; straightens roads by pulling them. [Am. Lit.: Fisher, 270]
Bionic Man
superman of the technological age. [TV: “The Six Million Dollar Man” in Terrace, II: 294–295]
buffalo
heraldic symbol of power. [Heraldry: Halberts, 21]
Bunyan, Paul
legendary woodsman of prodigious strength. [Am. Folklore: Paul Bunyan]
Cyclopes
one-eyed giants; builders of fortifications. [Gk. Myth.: Avery, 346]
Hercules
his twelve labors revealed his godlike powers. [Rom. Myth.: Howe, 122]
Katinka, the Powerful
a female Man Mountain Dean. [Am. Comics: “Toonerville Folks” in Horn, 668]
Little John
oak of a man in Robin Hood’s band. [Br. Lit.: Robin Hood]
meginjardir
Thor’s belt; doubled his power. [Norse Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 1076]
Milo of Croton
renowned athlete. [Gk. Myth.: Hall, 209]
Polydamas
huge athlete who killed a fierce lion with his bare hands, stopped a rushing chariot, lifted a mad bull, and died attempting to stop a falling rock. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 801]
Samson
possessed extraordinary might which derived from hair. [O.T.: Judges 16:17]
Superman
caped superhero and modern-day Hercules. [Comics: Horn, 642–643]
References in periodicals archive ?
With regard to identity formation during adolescence, Erikson (1968) posited that the ego strengths of will, purpose, and fidelity are of foremost importance for the resolution of the identity versus identity confusion crisis.
Despite the importance that Erikson gave to the ego strengths in the process of identity formation, empirical studies testing these theoretical claims have been almost completely absent from the literature (Markstrom et al.
The present research sought to find empirical evidence concerning Erikson's view that adolescent identity exploration is associated with reduced ego strength and the occurrence of psychological and physical symptoms.
During each of these periods of the life cycle, research focusing on individual development within an Eriksonian framework of ego strengths and virtues is highlighted.
In my opinion, the real secret to helping a special child achieve a rewarding adulthood has to do with the guidance and ego strengths they achieve as they grow.