eidetic imagery

eidetic imagery

[ī′ded·ik ′im·ij·rē]
(psychology)
Imagery in extreme detail; a sort of projection of an image on a mental screen.
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Eidetic imagery is defined by the dictionary as "of, relating to, or constituting visual imagery vividly experienced and readily reproducible with great accuracy and in great detail" (from the Greek root for "equivalent to"; http://www.
For further discussion of these matters, including the idea that eidetic imagery can be developed, and the idea that there are commonalities between mental imagery, hypnotic, and meditational states, see Bushell 2009b).
One can understand this as a case involving both extremely accurate eidetic imagery and a subitizing or subitizing-like capacity, and a case in which such mental imagery functions mnemonically in an applied way to enable detection of extremely miniscule alterations in visual fields, ie, eidetically memorized star fields.
This methodology was developed to clinically test stereoscopic vision, and was adapted to test for eidetic imagery, because in the test for eidetic imagery, one of the fields is removed before the fusion step in the test.
Returning to consideration of the claims of the tradition of Indo-Tibetan Kalachakra Mandala practice, we can already appreciate the potential range of human visual capacities, in terms not only of least light perception, but also of hyperacuity, eidetic imagery and memory, and subitizing, before continuing to consider the claims of that tradition.
Twenty years of haunting eidetic imagery Where's the ghost?
eidetic imagery, entoptic phenomena, hallucination, synesthesia), psi experiences (e.
Given Kubler's positive endorsement of Galton's theory of eidetic imagery, and his strangely neutral discussions of other authors such as William Henry Holmes (p.
A rare form of vivid mental imagery, called 'typographic' eidetic imagery, occurs when there is a visual image that persists after stimulation, is relatively accurate in detail, positively coloured, and is capable of being scanned (Haber, 1979).
The results for recall of the matrix offer no evidence for any simple form of eidetic imagery in any of the subjects.