eigenfrequency

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eigenfrequency

[′ī·gən‚frē·kwən·sē]
(physics)
One of the frequencies at which an oscillatory system can vibrate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Before this first report in 1961, many geophysicists understood that the eigenfrequencies of the modes were key for inferring the Earth's geophysical properties, following Lord Kelvin's estimation of the molten Earth.
As described before, a broad band excitation due to each single impact takes place and the system starts to oscillate with its eigenfrequencies.
The sharp drop in the values of all coefficients at [beta] > 50 agrees with the growth in eigenfrequencies, as follows from (Polyakov 2012b).
Strictly speaking, for the perturbed interface ([gamma] > 0), the eigenfrequencies of the structure are complex.
Eigenfrequencies of the reinforced concrete beams--methods of calculations, Journal of Civil Engineering and Management 17(2): 278-283.
From a probabilistic perspective, he provides up to a fourth central probabilistic-moments analysis of state functions-- deformations, stresses, temperatures, eigenfrequencies, and so on-- because then it is possible to verify whether these functions really have Gaussian distributions or not.
It is supposed that particularly the 1st and 2nd eigenfrequencies of the drive system (approximately 14 Hz and 29 Hz) as well as higher frequency peaks will be recognizable in the oscillation spectrum.
From the behavior of the eigenfrequencies as a function of the wavenumber (dispersion relation) is possible to calculate important quantities such as the phase and group electromagnetic wave velocities.
1) gives the vibration eigenfrequencies w = [square root of ([lambda][[mu].
If the array of resonators is actuated by any signal, only those resonators will start to vibrate which eigenfrequencies are equal to frequency components contained in the input signal.
Assuming the spacings to be half wavelengths, and using the measured velocities, the data gave one a spectrum of what were called the eigenfrequencies of plants (Figure 2).
This may be applicable in situations where precise measurements are not of major concern, for instance simply for roughly locating the eigenfrequencies of vibrating systems.