ejecta blanket


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ejecta blanket

A deposit of ejecta from a crater or basin, the thickness of which decreases with distance from the crater or basin rim. The surface may exhibit transverse dunes, radial furrows, and secondary craters.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, observed local normal faults along the inner ring together with radially sparse irregular blocks over flat terrains can be associated with terraced rimsor collapse of the inner crater structure and ejecta blanket, respectively (Hernandez et al., 2011).
Painstaking examination of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter images has turned up traces of 32 spacecraft or components that have crashed into or landed on the Moon--but the tiny crater and ejecta blanket created by the impact of Luna 2 remain an elusive needle in a vast haystack.
The research, hinging on an "ejecta blanket" of material at the site, is revealed in a new TV show Walking Through Time.
While most of Nix is a neutral white, the crater and its ejecta blanket (the material thrown out by the crater) appear to be a much redder material.
Another indication of subsurface water is seen in the fluidised ejecta blanket surrounding the crater at the northern edge of the first and topographic images.
Research the following impact crater features: rays, rim, ejecta blanket, wall, floor, central peak.
Originally, the location was unknown, but LRO scientists discovered the small depression it made near the crater Sundman V in the Orientale Basin ejecta blanket. In fact, if you can see the large crater Einstein when libration along the western limb is good, the region beyond--almost visible--is the resting place for LADEE.
The ejecta blanket emanating from the deep crater in the middle of the image shows evidence for volatiles, possibly water ice, while the main crater rim to the top (south) of the image shows evidence for so-called "mass wasting".
But far more noteworthy is the shape of the resulting ejecta blanket. A dramatic example is Proclus (L12 in the Lunar 100), a crater 28 kilometers (17 miles) wide just west of Mare Crisium.
On the far left side of the image, parts of an ejecta blanket can be seen, made of material excavated from the ground during the formation of an impact crater.