ejector rod

ejector rod

[ē′jek·tər ′räd]
(engineering)
A rod that activates the ejector assembly of a mold when it is opened.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the revolver held vertically, depress the ejector rod with your index finger to discard expended rounds.
In late 1907 S&W did almost everything right with the introduction of their first swing-out cylindered big-bore sixgun, the 1st Model Hand Ejector (also known as the "New Century" and more lovingly known by sixgunners for over a century, as the Triple-Lock.) This revolver's cylinder locked at the back, at the front of the ejector rod, and a third lock beautifully machined at the front of the cylinder in the yoke/frame area.
I recently had a Charter Bulldog Pup in the shop with a very rough second stage of the ejector rod. Disassembly of the cylinder, ejector rod, extractor star, and accompanying parts revealed some very rough surfaces that were quickly cleaned up.
This morning I went to the range and shot a PPC practice relay with my Ruger GP100 in .38 Special and did just as instructed: "Point the end of the muzzle straight up, give the ejector rod a good rap, then reload." It worked perfectly.
It was fitted with a lockup at the cylinder face, one at the end of the ejector rod, and the third was a rock-solid bolt and notch that locked the yoke into the frame at the rear of the heavy ejector-rod shroud that gave the revolver its unique look.
By removing the ejector rod's shroud and the intricately machined 3rd lock on the crane they could reduce retail price to $19.
I tried the old trick of turning the cylinder in the opposite direction of normal rotation in order to tighten the ejector rod and nothing happened.
The ejector rod is fully enclosed in a recess integral with the barrel.
The cylinder locks both at the rear of the frame and at the yoke rather than at the front of the ejector rod.
Second, the short barrel means a short ejector rod. The Pink Lady ejector rod is enclosed in the barrel shroud, to protect it, but it is still short.
The dry lubing did create a protective byproduct I particularly appreciated when I cleaned the yoke assembly and ejector rod on a fairly well-used (and occasionally shamefully abused) old S&W Model 15.