elect

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elect

1. voted into office but not yet installed
2. Christianity
a. selected or predestined by God to receive salvation; chosen
b. (as collective noun; preceded by the): the elect
References in periodicals archive ?
They want an electable candidate to emerge early so that work on the November campaign can begin.
Mr Corbyn's camp hit back, saying: "Gordon Brown has highlighted the need for a Labour Party that stands for hope, that is credible, radical and electable - on which basis the best candidate to vote for is Jeremy Corbyn.
We have already discovered that the pool of electable talent for existing public offices is lamentably small, if it exists at all.
Her pay masters made her change her image by altering the way she walked, talked and by changing her hairstyle in order to make her more electable, in other words she did what she was told.
The reason the public believes that all major political parties are the same is that, since Tony Blair, they have all tried to occupy the middle ground to make themselves electable.
Your candidates in each constituency, winning candidates, electable candidates in each constituency.
The PTI will approach electable politicians from each constituency, but they will be routed through the authorised party channels only," The Express Tribune quoted Khan, as saying.
amp;nbsp;"Any Republican candidate is very, very electable," she said.
The conventional wisdom holds that moving the state's March primary to April would give greater clout to more conservative states, thus enhancing the chances of more conservative Republican candidates, while hurting the chances of the moderate, and presumably more electable, ones.
It's just a shame that Michael Gove seems to have a sharper grasp of what the Labour Party needs to do to make itself electable than he does about what people expect of him as education secretary.
for What he also was, of course, was a pretty useless leader of a political party who led Labour to one of their most crushing defeats with a manifesto forever known as "the longest suicide note in history", and leaving it in such a shambles it took Neil Kinnock all of his time at the helm to make it even remotely electable.