constituency

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Related to election district: Electoral district

constituency

1. the whole body of voters who elect one representative to a legislature or all the residents represented by one deputy
2. 
a. a district that sends one representative to a legislature
b. (as modifier): constituency organization
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The committee determined that the formation of special election districts to assure much wider representation was critical to the success of a convention.
Subsequently, we carry out a series of regression analyses using county-level data on newspaper circulation and election results as well as radio signal strength, which was estimated using geographic information system (GIS) and the Irregular Terrain Model (Hufford 2002) based on data on radio transmitters and spatial boundaries of election districts.
(445) For those election districts within Kiryas Joel, turnout was 77%, and in the town outside that village it was 57%.
Comparing with the least-populated districts, the majority of Justices in this case held that the 5 to 1 ratio of voters per delegate in the first election district of Chiba Prefecture violated the principles of equality under the law, unless otherwise justified by rational election policy.
Second, one could imagine a scenario in which, under the Census Bureau's existing usual residence rule, a minority community is not large enough to constitute the majority of an election district, but could reach the 50% threshold necessary to state a claim under section 2 once the community's incarcerated members are reallocated to their homes.
presidential election districts, or existing congressional districts
Justice Black, in a dissent which cast the die in future case reasoning, argued: While the Constitution contains no express provision requiring that Congressional election districts established by the States must contain approximately equal populations, the constitutional guaranteed right to vote and the right to have one's vote counted clearly imply the policy that State election systems, no matter what their form, should be designed to give approximately equal weight of each vote cast ...
If you live in a hotly contested election district, you're likely familiar with "robo--calls"--the prerecorded pleas from pols that litter answering machines in the weeks before an election.
(69) </pre> <p>Jack's first job, like that of so many other West Indian immigrant members of the New York Democratic Party, consisted of collecting signatures on voting petitions and other menial jobs, but he quickly worked his way up to captain of his Election District, an impressive position for an African American man in the Depression era.
The claim by lobbyists about the cost advantages of a DRE is that they would cost "roughly $7,500 an election district." "Omitted have been the differences in storage, training and transportation costs for DRE systems over paper ballot and optical scanners.
The unfinished, junk-filled basement with an open toilet that O'Hara claimed was his "apartment" was an uninhabitable sham residence, intended to permit him to vote and campaign in the election district where he was a perennial candidate and which, after redistricting, no longer included his true residence.