elector


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Related to elector: electoral college, Electoral roll

elector

1. someone who is eligible to vote in the election of a government
2. a member of the US electoral college
3. (in the Holy Roman Empire) any of the German princes entitled to take part in the election of a new emperor
References in classic literature ?
In certain cases, the electors form a council to him.
The German elector was proclaimed king from the balcony of the town- house in Boston, by the title of George I.
The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States, and the electors in each State shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State legislature.
The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by Ballot for two Persons, of whom one at least shall not lie an Inhabitant of the same State with themselves.
Everything goes by fours in that shop," cried a third; "the four nations, the four faculties, the four feasts, the four procurators, the four electors, the four booksellers.
In remorse the Sovereign Elector deprived himself of political influence by learning to read.
Lynde says Canada is going to the dogs the way things are being run at Ottawa and that it's an awful warning to the electors.
He was annoyed at his son's being there, at the bedside, when he ought to have been addressing the electors.
Because, in the first place, if the principle of election is to be the basis of a system, absolute equality among the electors is a first requirement; they ought to be 'equal quantities,' things which modern politics will never bring about.
Or why the audience (provided they travel, like electors, without any expense) may not be wafted fifty miles as well as five?
Then Veneering repairs to the legal gentleman in Britannia's confidence, and with him transacts some delicate affairs of business, and issues an address to the independent electors of Pocket-Breaches, announcing that he is coming among them for their suffrages, as the mariner returns to the home of his early childhood: a phrase which is none the worse for his never having been near the place in his life, and not even now distinctly knowing where it is.
The GAZETTE warned the electors of Eatanswill that the eyes not only of England, but of the whole civilised world, were upon them; and the INDEPENDENT imperatively demanded to know, whether the constituency of Eatanswill were the grand fellows they had always taken them for, or base and servile tools, undeserving alike of the name of Englishmen and the blessings of freedom.