electric dipole


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Related to electric dipole: Electric flux, magnetic dipole

electric dipole

[i¦lek·trik ′dī‚pōl]
(electricity)
A localized distribution of positive and negative electricity, without net charge, whose mean positions of positive and negative charges do not coincide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dong, "Modeling 3-D electromagnetic responses of the electric dipole using volume integral equation method," Progress in Geophysics, vol.
Eleven yellow stingrays were successfully conditioned to discriminate between the anode (n = 5) and cathode (n = 6) of an electric dipole after 24 training sessions ([F.
If the equivalent form is used, an N-turn NMHA can be regarded as a combination of the electric dipole [I.
Recall that an electric dipole antenna is a pair of conducting bodies (usually spheres or rectangular plates) of finite capacitance connected by a thin wire of negligible capacitance through an oscillator.
When the electric dipole is placed in a homogeneous electric field, it is only influenced by a force couple that tends to rotate the dipole.
Electric dipole, quadrupole, and magnetic dipole transition probabilities of ions isoelectronic to the first-row atoms, Li through F.
Although the OH spectrum had been previously observed, the stronger signals obtained with the NBS apparatus allowed the first precise measurement of the electric dipole moment.
Here the field-induced shape and crystallization transitions occurred because formamide, like water and many other materials, is characterized by a relatively large electric dipole moment.
For this research, graphene was used to write and read the electric dipole moments of an underlying ferroelectric material.
The point electric dipole consists of two equal and opposite charges +q and -q separated by an infinitesimal distance d apart.
15) According to his theory, components with electric dipole oscillations interact through nonlinear long-range Coulomb forces and thus establish a branch or branches of longitudinal electric modes in a frequency range of 10 (11)-10 (12) sec- (1).
These common currents look like an electric dipole antenna and are typically driven by voltages on the planes (FIGURE 1).