electric guitar

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electric guitar

an electrically amplified guitar, used mainly in pop music

electric guitar

[i¦lek·trik gə′tär]
(engineering acoustics)
A guitar in which a contact microphone placed under the strings picks up the acoustic vibrations for amplification and for reproduction by a loudspeaker.
References in periodicals archive ?
Technavio's analysts forecast the global electric guitar market to grow at a CAGR of 3.
I know that the charities such as Jail Guitar Doors have donated a number of electric guitars to prisons over the past few years; those guitars are most often kept in educational or chaplaincy departments for prisoners to use in a supervised environment rather than kept by individual prisoners.
GUITAR HERO: Keith Chapman is an engineer and band member who designs electric guitars.
In 2005 he released a double-Grammy winning album, "Les Paul and Friends: American Made World Played," with electric guitar heroes including Keith Richards and Eric Clapton.
MUSIC MEN Electric guitar designers Dave Sharpe and Joe Krozka have a workshop in Ashington
A Gibson Flying V electric guitar, used by Bolan, was sold recently at auction and made a very big noise.
There's a little bit of the outlaw in the electric guitar," marketer Simons says.
The music moves along at a steady, mid-tempo pace, with acoustic and electric guitars combining for a light country-rock sound.
Acoustic and electric guitars by Martin, Gibson, Fender, Gretsch, and other legendary companies are presented, along with masterpieces of the guitar maker's art by such truly legendary luthiers as James D'Aquisto, Elmer Stromberge, and John Monteleone.
The kit includes everything you need for start-up, with patterns ranging from teacups, cats and strawberries to electric guitars, hula girls and skulls (for you edgy girls who have the itch to stitch).
At first glance, Kartscher's images--stormy seas, crystal mountains, musical notes, playing cards, giant eagles--seem to recall cover art for rock albums from the '70s and '80s, like those of ELO and Styx, who revived macho romanticism with synthesizers and electric guitars.
The main goal of working on electric guitars he says is the "tone and sustain, but sometimes those factors work against the other.