electric-field strength

electric-field strength

[i¦lek·trik ¦fēld ′streŋkth]
(electricity)
References in periodicals archive ?
With the increase in the voltage level of transmission lines, electric-field strength on the surface of transmission lines will increase accordingly.
The model for the electric-field strength distribution is constructed and validated with simulations and measurements for a WiFi access point and an Long-Term Evolution (LTE) femtocell.
In this section, the model to predict the electric-field strength caused by a transmitter will be derived.
and knowing that for dipoles ERP [dBm] = EIRP [dBm] - 2.15, we obtain the following formula for the electric-field strength E [V/m] at a certain location, as a function of the EIRP, the path loss, and the frequency:
Electric-field strength simulations are executed for a dipole EIRP (Equivalent Isotropically Radiated Power) of 20 dBm and at distances between 3.5 and 50 cm from the dipole.
Figure 1(a) compares the simulated (half-wavelength dipole at 2400 MHz) and measured electric-field strength with the field strengths prediction by the WHIPP model (see Equation (3)), as a function of the separation d from the dipole.
The figure shows that again, the electric-field strength as predicted by the WHIPP model is a very good approximation for the simulated near-field electric-field strength.
To calculate the electric-field strength at a certain location, we will only consider the electric-field strength [E.sub.dom] caused by the most dominant source (i.e., the source causing the highest electric-field value at that location), in order to speed up the calculations.
[E.sub.i] is the electric-field strength caused by transmitting source i.
The two most commonly used [I.sub.c] criteria are the electric-field strength (often referred to as just electric field) criterion [E.sub.c] and the resistivity criterion [P.sub.c].
Most of the [I.sub.c] measurements reported here were made using an electric-field strength criterion of 0.1[micro]V/cm Some of the [I.sub.c] data at 1 [micro]V/cm are provided on the Bi-2212 specimen because the n-values are low, which causes the critical currents at the two criteria to differ significantly.
At microscales, we can use its electrostatic analog, since the electric-field strength is very much greater at short distances, so the power density of an electrostatic induction motor/generator can be similar." He described the microturbine generator as "a stepping-motor generator" with the rotor composed of a uniform conductor and the stator arranged in pie-shaped segments.

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