electrical interference


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Related to electrical interference: Electromagnetic interference

electrical interference

[i′lek·trə·kəl ‚in·tər′fir·əns]
(analytical chemistry)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has very low sensitivity to electrical interference, which is a good thing, is not as bulky as some of the other similar devices and also "avoids physical mechanical motion as the structure is not suspended."
Amid the hiss and sizzle of static, a weak, foreign voice struggled to be heard: a mere whisper above the angry, blight - akin to frying bacon - of electrical interference.
While such electrical interference has been known for a while and has been studied by vendors from a reliability standpoint -- because memory corruption can lead to system crashes -- researchers have shown that it can also have serious security implications when triggered in a controlled manner.
Among the advantages cited by the investigators of going with curettage alone were its simplicity, reduced equipment requirement, cost-effectiveness, lack of electrical interference with implantable cardiac devices, avoidance of potentially hazardous viral smoke plumes, and reduced rates of hypopigmentation and scarring.
electrical interference that will impact WiFi speeds.
Electrical interference can cause the hybrid system to switch into a fail-safe limp-home mode, disabling the petrol engine and limiting vehicle speed to 40 mph.
The IQ3+ ST continues to offer MaxDrive, an enhanced field strength feature to benefit suppliers of dry goods, and a built-in EnviroScan to distinguish and filter external vibrations and electrical interference that can impair detection performance.
This phase is necessary to protect the chip, facilitate its integration into electronic systems, limit electrical interference and enable the dissipation of heat from the device.
The switch to electrical aircraft steering mechanisms from older systems of pulleys, cables and hydraulics posed further risk to the plane, since those critical flight controls, known as "fly-by-wire" systems, added to the components that could be affected by electrical interference.
The switch to electrical aircraft steering mechanisms from older systems of pulleys, cables and hydraulics posed further risk to the plane, since those critical flight controls, known as "fly-by-wire" systems, added to the components that could be affected by electrical interference. Current commercial aircraft, made by Boeing, Airbus, Embraer and Bombardier, are designed to resist interference from portable electronic devices.

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