electroceutical


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electroceutical

(ELECTROnic pharmaCEUTICAL) Bioelectronic devices implanted in the human body. Pacemakers and defibrillators were the first such devices, followed by implants in the spine, ears and eyes. Instead of drugs (pharmaceutical), electroceutical devices stimulate nerves and tissue. See bioinformatics and micro array.


Amazing Potential
In 2014, Stanford University researchers Ada Poon and John Ho invented a wireless chip the size of a grain of rice (top) that attaches to and stimulates nerves to relieve chronic pain and other diseases. "Neurostimulator" chips can be implanted deep in the body and powered externally via "midfield" electromagnetic radiation. The implants can contain their own minuscule rechargeable battery or be batteryless and activated when therapy is needed. (Images courtesy of Poon Lab, Stanford Engineering Department.)


Amazing Potential
In 2014, Stanford University researchers Ada Poon and John Ho invented a wireless chip the size of a grain of rice (top) that attaches to and stimulates nerves to relieve chronic pain and other diseases. "Neurostimulator" chips can be implanted deep in the body and powered externally via "midfield" electromagnetic radiation. The implants can contain their own minuscule rechargeable battery or be batteryless and activated when therapy is needed. (Images courtesy of Poon Lab, Stanford Engineering Department.)
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The global electroceutical devices market size was valued at US$ 16,141.8 Mn in 2017, and is expected to witness a CAGR of 6.8% over the forecast period (2018 - 2026).
The electroceutical devices global market is segmented into internal and external electroceutical devices based on the type.
The Asia-Pacific region is expected to witness the highest growth rate in the forecast period, mainly due to the rising adoption of neurostimulation, increasing cases of diabetes, increasing prevalence of hearing loss, increasing geriatric population, conferences on electroceutical devices, increasing prevalence of Parkinson's Disease, and regulatory approvals of cochlear implants in the Asia-Pacific region.
The company, says John LaLonde, vice president of product development, technology, and research at its neuromodulation unit, is "always open to additional new ideas that may lead to new therapies." While noting that too little is still known about the electroceutical concept, LaLonde believes that collaboration between the pharmaceutical and medical-device industries could lead to "advancements in the technology."
The company said its Pulsante microstimulator is the first electroceutical device that has documented efficacy in a long term RCT for the treatment of cluster headache.
Theranica is a medical device company that combines advanced neuromodulation therapy with modern wireless technology to develop proprietary electroceuticals that address prevalent medical conditions and diseases.
As a member of this year's steering committee, I co-authored two of technology write-ups, on electroceuticals (devices that treat ailments with electrical impulses) and augmented reality.
Bioelectronic medicines (also known as electroceuticals or neuromodulation) like SetPoint's implantable vagus nerve stimulator may prove to be a healthier and lower-cost alternative to drug therapy for treating chronic inflammatory diseases.
Some technologies set to create billion-dollar opportunities include wearables, enhanced prosthetics, nanorobotics, electroceuticals, advanced materials, population health analytics, quantum computing, wellness gamification, regenerative medicine, and precision medicine.
(OTCQB: ENDV) to acquire Santa Fe, New Mexico-based electroceuticals developeRio Grande Neurosciences has been dissolved effective, the company said.
This is reflected in the high number of treatment-related projects (n = 46) examining the effectiveness of exercise and activity; complementary approaches, including electroceuticals (e.g., transcranial magnetic stimulation) and yoga; and testing different formulations of drug therapies focused not only on pain but also on coexisting conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, sleep, and substance use disorders.
Today's burgeoning field of "electroceuticals" takes advantage of the same principle.