electrochromic material

electrochromic material

[i‚lek·trə¦krōm·ik mə′tir·ē·əl]
(materials)
An organic or inorganic substance that can interconvert between two or more colored states upon oxidation or reduction, that is, upon electrolytic loss or gain of electrons.
References in periodicals archive ?
In summary, we fabricated a flexible and transparent electrochromic device with graphene and PEDOT:PSS with xylitol as a processing additive as the interchangeable electrodes while PEDOT:PSS functions as an electrochromic material. The ionic medium in this parallel plate capacitor geometry was incorporated in the transparent and elastic polyurethane substrate enabling a nonhazardous and an environmentally friendly device structure.
The new electrochromic material, like its high-temperature processed counterpart, has an amorphous structure, meaning the atoms lack any long-range organization as would be found in a crystal.
The researchers have proposed an alternative method using an electrochromic material, often referred to as 'smart glass', which transforms from a transparent material into an opaque material when a small electrical voltage is applied to it.
The device fabrication and driving mode for this technology is simple, the driving voltage can be as low as about 1V, and the most important factor in this technology is electrochromic material. Currently, the limits of electrochromic display are switching speed and switching lifetime.
Liquid crystal (LC) is a typical electrochromic material [15].
At the heart of the technology is a new "designer" electrochromic material, made from nanocrystals of indium tin oxide embedded in a glassy matrix of niobium oxide.
Their topics include black molybdenum solar absorbers, molybdenum oxide thin films as electrochromic material, and thin films of chromium oxide.
Ynvisible has experience, know-how and intellectual property in the field of electrochromic materials, inks, and systems.
is a developer and manufacturer of thin flexible transparent electrodes and matching electrochromic materials and devices based on it, with diverse market applications.
Lampert, "Electrochromic materials and devices for energy efficient windows," Solar Energy Materials, vol.
Granqvist, Handbook of Electrochromic Materials, Elsevier, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 1995.
Thermochromic and photochromic materials that change colour according to temperature or light intensity are already available, but electrochromic materials that change colour under the influence of electricity might well hold the best promises for military applications.