electrodermal response


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Related to electrodermal response: Psychogalvanic Reflex, galvanic skin responses

Electrodermal response

A transient change in certain electrical properties of the skin, associated with the sweat gland activity and elicited by any stimulus that evokes an arousal or orienting response. Originally termed the psychogalvanic reflex, this phenomenon became known as the galvanic skin response. Electrodermal response (EDR) has replaced galvanic skin response as the collective term.

The skin of a relaxed person has a low electrical conductance (high resistance), and the skin surface is some 40 mV negative with respect to interior tissues. Sweat gland activity changes these electrical properties by increasing skin conductance and by changing the balance of positive and negative ions in the secreted fluid.

Tonic skin conductance varies with psychological arousal, rising sharply when the subject awakens and rising further with activity, mental effort, or especially stress. Phasic skin conductance responses are wavelike increases in skin conductance that begin 1–2 s after stimulus onset and peak within about 5 s. The amplitude of the skin conductance response varies with the subjective impact of the eliciting stimulus, which in turn varies with the intensity of the stimulus, its novelty or unexpectedness for the subject, and its meaning or signal value. Aroused subjects display spontaneous skin conductance responses, generated apparently by mental events or other internal stimuli; their frequency, like the tonic skin conductance level, increases with the level of arousal.

Electrodermal responses are measured in studies of emotion and stress, conditioning, habituation, and cognitive processing, that is, when it is desired to assess the differential or changing impact of a series of stimuli. See Electroencephalography, Sympathetic nervous system

electrodermal response

[i‚lek·trə¦dərm·əl ri′späns]
(physiology)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Studies (e.g., Bierman & Radin, 1997) have shown evidence of an increase in electrodermal response amplitudes several seconds before an emotional picture is presented.
While this is a sensible precaution, it has restricted the design of experiments on habituation of electrodermal responses. Experiments using event-related potentials (ERPs) as the dependent measure have been generally conducted with much shorter (commonly 1-2s) ISIs.
The information content of the recovery limb of the electrodermal response. Psychophysiology, 6, 527-539.
For an electrodermal response to a sensory stimulus, a rapid increase shortly (1-5 s) after the stimulus onset would typically be expected, followed by a slower decrease (Cacioppo & Tassinary, 1990).
McGrath et al., "Electrodermal responses to sensory stimuli in individuals with fragile X syndrome: a preliminary report," American Journal of Medical Genetics, vol.
Phasic electrodermal responses associated with whole-body instability: presence and influence of expectation.
Critchley, "Electrodermal responses: what happens in the brain," Neuroscientist, vol.
Furthermore, the algorithm measured two features from startle response (magnitude, rise time) that could be derived from the 'onset' and the 'peak' of electrodermal responses.
All of the children had their electrodermal responses (EDR), their respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), and their cardiac pre-ejection period (PEP) measured during three successive experimental conditions: a 5-minute baseline, a monetary incentive task, and negative mood induction via an emotionally evocative film clip.
All children had their electrodermal responses (EDR), their respiratory sinus ar rhythmia (RSA), and their cardiac pre-ejection period (PEP) measured during three successive experimental conditions: a 5-minute baseline, a monetary incentive task, and negative mood induction via an emotionally evocative film clip.
Lovibond further demonstrated that certainty reduced feelings of aversion and also electrodermal responses. Katz and Wykes (1985) examined the effects of predictable and unpredictable electrical stimuli in 80 female participants and demonstrated that predictability reduced stress as measured by electrodermal activity.
In one study, Lovibond (1963) demonstrated that electrodermal responses of homosexual males could be conditioned, using film clips of nude males as unconditioned stimuli (USs) and abstract symbols as conditioned stimuli (CSs).