electroencephalogram


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to electroencephalogram: electromyography, epilepsy

electroencephalogram

[i‚lek·trō·en′sef·ə·lə‚gram]
(medicine)
A graphic recording of the electric discharges of the cerebral cortex as detected by electrodes on the surface of the scalp. Abbreviated EEG.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Electroencephalogram Alterations During Perception of Pleasant and Unpleasant Odors.
Electroencephalograms were taken by Micromed 18 channel digital video EEG device found in the Division of Pediatric Neurology using international 18-20 electrode system.
A thalamic location of involvement is consistent with the electroencephalograms, pattern of slowing of background activity mainly in delta to theta range (5).
An electroencephalogram showed generalized slow waves, consistent with severe diffuse encephalopathy.
Developed by a research team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tenn., SeizAlert's early warning capability is obtained by advanced nonlinear statistical analysis of real-time multichannel scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) data.
The findings give researchers hope that "certain blood and electroencephalogram [EEG] tests might be able to identify children who are more likely to become alcoholics," science writer Steven Stocker told the World Future Society, Bethesda, Md.
By placing the electrodes of an electroencephalogram on the skull right above the cerebral cortex, one can record brain waves that reveal a range of levels of consciousness, from alertness (beta waves) to NREM sleep (delta waves).
An electroencephalogram (ih-LEK-troh-in-SE-fuh-luh-gram), which measures electrical activity in the brain, determined that the seizure was centered on her brain's left side.
Thus, the Harvard committee's new standards specified that, before the respirator could be turned off, four requirements had to be met: a flat electroencephalogram over a twenty-four-hour period; no response to external stimulation; no spontaneous breathing; and pupils fixed and dilated.
Or perhaps the few contemporary artistic attempts in the same vein (e.g., Robert Morris' Self-Portrait [EEG], 1963, an electroencephalogram of the artist that was equal in length to Morris' height)?
20 high and 20 low anxious individuals played a risk game while investigators recorded their brain responses via electroencephalogram during a recently conducted study.
SedLine helps clinicians monitor the state of the brain under anesthesia with bilateral acquisition and processing of four leads of electroencephalogram signals.