electromagnetic energy


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electromagnetic energy

[i¦lek·trō·mag′ned·ik ′en·ər·jē]
(electromagnetism)
The energy associated with electric or magnetic fields.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Einstein's 1905 derivation, (2) he believed [7] that the corresponding was between mass and any type of energy although he dealt with only the light, which may include more than just electromagnetic energy.
Many people believe electromagnetic energy will eventually play a paramount role in neuronal regeneration and restoring function after injury.
This electromagnetic energy is subject to reflection, transmission, and absorption.
There we see that electronic warfare is "Military action involving the use of electromagnetic energy to determine, exploit, reduce or prevent hostile use of the electromagnetic spectrum and action which retains friendly use.
Making the standards publicly available should also help allay concerns about the safety of exposure to electromagnetic energy.
Our atmosphere is filled with electromagnetic energy from many sources.
Component test methods for electrical disturbances from narrow band radiated electromagnetic energy.
Particular focus is on developments in passive devices, such as those controllable through magnetic or electric fields and electromagnetic energy transmission lines.
Electromagnetic energy represents one mechanism by which prayer can be transformed into healing power.
His design depends on being able to tap into the Earth's electromagnetic energy.
These signals travel via the airwaves, satellites, or cable as a continuous stream of electromagnetic energy (like light and radio waves).
Stanford University's Umran Inan and Yuri Taranenko then theorized that when powerful lightning sparks to the ground, it sends up a pulse of electromagnetic energy that heats the ionosphere, causing atoms and molecules there to glow.

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