electromagnetic energy


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electromagnetic energy

[i¦lek·trō·mag′ned·ik ′en·ər·jē]
(electromagnetism)
The energy associated with electric or magnetic fields.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, to interpret that electromagnetic energy has a mass equivalence, the coincidence (3) is far from adequate (Lo 2006).
The continuum of the electromagnetic energy is the electromagnetic spectrum (see Figure 1).
The IEEE C95 standards represent more than 50 years of scientific research and standardization activity conducted by the most diverse international forum developing standards for the safe use of electromagnetic energy.
Procurement in Order to Equip the Laboratory for Energy Recovery From Environmental Pollution Electromagnetic Vibrational Want Purchase the Following Equipment: (I) to Characterize the System Frequency Electromagnetic Energy in Specific Areas of Environmental Pollution; (Ii) Monitoring System and Analyzing the Dynamic Behavior of Noise and Vibration From Road and Rail Artwork.
The procedure utilizes electromagnetic energy, precisely delivered to the area under the arm where the sweat glands reside, to eliminate the glands and reduce or eliminate the incidence of underarm sweat.
Before Hasenohrl focused on cavity radiation, other physicists, including French mathematician Henri Poincare and German physicist Max Abraham, showed the existence of an inertial mass associated with electromagnetic energy.
Our atmosphere is filled with electromagnetic energy from many sources.
The book begins with a review of the polarized nature of electromagnetic energy and radiometry, then looks at ways to characterize a beam of polarized energy (Stokes vectors) and polarized energy matter interactions (Mueller matrices).
Repeating the above procedure for the electromagnetic energy (7) we find
A civil protection spokesman said: "We are not saying little green men from Mars started the fires but that unnatural forces capable of creating a large amount of electromagnetic energy were responsible.
It's the first time light has been trapped while keeping its electromagnetic energy intact.
But the new research, by a team at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, is the first to trap light while keeping its electromagnetic energy intact.

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