electromagnetic momentum

electromagnetic momentum

[i¦lek·trō·mag′ned·ik mə′men·təm]
(electromagnetism)
The momentum transported by electromagnetic radiation; its volume density equals the Poynting vector divided by the square of the speed of light.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Here, obstructions are mainly black holes, and massive stars, or any significant electrostatic system, moving with a certain velocity (v) corresponding to an electromagnetic momentum, (H).
The electromagnetic momentum can be expressed as the multiplication of the vector (H) by the velocity (v), as (H x v).
In the presence of significant mass, and the electromagnetic momentum (H x v), the diagonal entries of the curl of (H) are given in (3)-(5) as:
In (3)-(5), (c) is the velocity of light, ([rho]) is the volume-density charge of a mass, and the vector (v) is the velocity of the electromagnetic momentum where v = ([v.
This is made in terms of the electromagnetic momentum density
can be interpreted as a local electromagnetic momentum density of the radiation field, with [?
can be interpreted as an electromagnetic momentum density with S denoting the Poynting vector, and

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