electromagnetism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to electromagnetism: Electromagnetic force, Electromagnetic induction

electromagnetism

1. magnetism produced by an electric current
2. the branch of physics concerned with magnetism produced by electric currents and with the interaction of electric and magnetic fields

Electromagnetism

The branch of science dealing with the observations and laws relating electricity to magnetism. Electromagnetism is based upon the fundamental observations that a moving electric charge produces a magnetic field and that a charge moving in a magnetic field will experience a force. The magnetic field produced by a current is related to the current, the shape of the conductor, and the magnetic properties of the medium around it by Ampère's law. The magnetic field at any point is described in terms of the force that it exerts upon a moving charge at that point. The electrical and magnetic units are defined in terms of the ampere, which in turn is defined from the force of one current upon another. The association of electricity and magnetism is also shown by electromagnetic induction, in which a changing magnetic field sets up an electric field within a conductor and causes the charges to move in the conductor. See Eddy current, Electricity, Electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law of induction, Hall effect, Inductance, Lenz's law, Reluctance

electromagnetism

[i¦lek·trō′mag·nə‚tiz·əm]
(physics)
Branch of physics relating electricity to magnetism.
Magnetism produced by an electric current rather than by a permanent magnet.
References in periodicals archive ?
In such a theory, gravity and electromagnetism would appear as differing aspects of some single, underlying phenomenon.
In addition, we use rationalized MKSA units for Electromagnetism, as the traditionally used Gaussian units are gradually being replaced by rationalized MKSA units in more recent textbooks (see for example [12]).
Physicists today are still chasing after the same dream of unification which Einstein and many others after him couldn't complete: unifying electromagnetism and gravity with the two remaining forces of nature which manifest themselves inside atomic nuclei: fairly creatively called the strong and weak nuclear forces.
And it claims maglev - which uses electromagnetism - would require substantial upfront investment.
He also explores things that you've seen on the show but wanted to know more about, such as what's behind the wall in the Hatch, where the mysterious electromagnetism is.
Using well-known episodes from the history of science, such as mechanical philosophy and Newtonian gravitation, elective affinities and the chemical revolution, natural history and taxonomy, evolutionary biology, the dynamical theory of electromagnetism, and quantum theory, Dear here reveals how the very different principles of knowing and doing were brought together as a new enterprise, science, which would be practiced by a new kind of person, the scientist.
Nobody in the 19th century realized that James Clerk Maxwell's electromagnetism equations eventually would produce television.
I find magnetism, or electromagnetism, contextually compelling as the 'invisible' or immaterial basis of computer technology and of every kind of information recording and transfer.
It explains how these "real magic" results are achieved based on principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, physics and electromagnetism In Some Science Adventures with Real Magic, Tiller and his co-authors attempt to bridge the gap between mainstream science and the frontiers of knowledge about healing and the nature of reality in which it is entrenched.
His future dreams include exploring the field of electromagnetism - a nontraditional career, but typical for the students at Bowman, who eschew the typical high school student mold.
Gravity, electromagnetism and light show 'the laws of nature' and all living nature--that is numbers 1, 2 and 3--derive from, and are dependent on, these more basic laws, their constants and materiality.
He looked to the example of Michael Faraday, who not only shaped our understanding of electromagnetism, but was also a landscape painter and heavily involved with London's arts world.