electron hole


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electron hole

[i′lek‚trän ¦hōl]
(solid-state physics)
References in periodicals archive ?
The wetting layer that has to be deposited in the first step causes problems, because it, too, contains excited electron hole states that decay and may release photons.
The energy states in the wetting layer are thus removed, which, in turn, makes it less likely for electrons and electron holes to recombine and emit photons.
The high speed of early reactions is needed to physically separate the electron and the "electron hole" by a large distance within a short time, so that a back reaction between the electron and the "electron hole" is unlikely.
The formation of an electron hole pair occurs within the conduction and valance bands of Ti[O.sub.2] semiconductor after absorption in UV range.
The recombination speed of the electrons that are disappeared as electrolytes through surface state is so slow as microseconds or milliseconds, resulting that most of the photoelectrons were inserted as the semiconductor does, while the rest that could not be inserted diminishes the solar cells' efficiency as it gets together again with electron holes [4].
This geometric arrangement spatially confines carriers of electrical charge such as electrons and "electron holes," which are mobile, positively charged microregions of a material that pair with free electrons.
The absorbed excess energy dislocates electrons from their atomic orbits, leaving behind "electron holes." The generation of such electron-hole pairs is a crucial process in any light-dependent energy process, and, in this case, it allows the MOF to affect a variety of chemical reactions.
The thermal wave appears to be entraining the electrical charge carriers (either electrons or electron holes) just as an ocean wave can pick up and carry a collection of debris along the surface, he explained.
"We call it electron entrainment, since part of the current appears to scale with wave velocity."The thermal wave, he explained, appears to be entraining the electrical charge carriers (either electrons or electron holes) just as an ocean wave can pick up and carry a collection of debris along the surface.

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