electron pair

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electron pair

[i′lek‚trän ′per]
(physical chemistry)
A pair of valence electrons which form a nonpolar bond between two neighboring atoms.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the simulation, it can be found that the inhibition efficiency afforded by DEAMB may be due to the its electron rich N atoms, imidazole and phenyl group, and the possible coordination points are unshared electron pair of heteroatoms and p-electrons of imidazole and phenyl group.
4 Formation of the Frolich electron pairs in superconductivity
One of the characteristics of metallic hexagonal crystals is diamagnetic behavior, and the thought occurred to me that if diamagnetic effects were enhanced several orders of magnitude by means of such electron pairs channeling through a hexagonal matrix, then the diamagnetic field generated could successfully grapple with even our weak geomagnetic field to effect a magnetic repulsion of a physical mass encountering and entering Earth's environment.
7 Bonding Described by Electron Pairs and Molecular Orbitals.
Their inhibiting action can be deduced based on the number of available electron pairs, pi-orbital behaviour of available electrons and the electron density around the heteroatom [11-16].
The year 2016 then, marks the 100th anniversary of Lewis's concept of the covalent bond model and electron pairs.
Detected electron pairs can bump into each other or into impurities in the solid, which dissipates energy and prevents the resistance-free flow seen in the superconducting state.
We propose that the quantum magnetodynamic interaction between the magnetic fields of the orbiting anti-parallel electron pairs in the various atoms is the missing component in Gillespie's explanation and that this along with the electric force prevents collapse in solids.
The magnitude of the electron density of the s- and p-bond electron pairs is nearly equal to 2-electrons which indicates that the C=O group does not gain any significant electron density from the conjugated system.
When most of these materials warm to the point that they can no longer superconduct, the electron pairs split up, the electrons start to regain their previous energies, and the gap closes.
This limitation in movement could be present in other states of electron pairs, such as the Cooper pairs of superconductivity, mainly in high Tc Superconductivity, for example.
In superconducting materials, electrons form pairs, called Cooper pairs, below a critical temperature and these electron pairs behave identically.

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