electron shell


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to electron shell: Electron configuration, Orbitals, Electron orbital, Electron shell configuration

electron shell

[i′lek‚trän ′shel]
(atomic physics)
The collection of all the electron states in an atom which have a given principal quantum number.
The collection of all the electron states in an atom which have a given principal quantum number and a given orbital angular momentum quantum number.
References in periodicals archive ?
207], wherein there is a fourth filled electron shell with 32 electrons and, accordingly, the fourth layer of 16 clusters in the nucleus.
Thus, knowing the structure of the atom electron shell and, accordingly, the number of protons in nucleus envelopes and its core, specifying the number of neutrons and having in mind the condition (23), one can try to reproduce the nucleus structure for different atoms and their isotopes.
Based only on the composition of the atom electron shells, it was possible to determine the nuclei binding energies, the nucleus neutron numbers, to reveal the important features of nuclei.
All of the elements in the same row, or period, have the same number of electron shells.
As an atom grows, its atomic number increases, as well as its atomic mass and the number of electron shells, or layers it has.
155, we are going to apply it to theoretical constructing the electron shells.
The main result means here the presence of a qualitative connexion between the electron shells and their graphical representation.
One way to describe these predictions is that the geometry of space itself is made out of discrete quanta analogous to the photons of light or the electron shells of atoms," Smolin says.
Each atom donates one electron, and this pair of electrons serve to fill the electron shells of both atoms .
These values correspond to the amounts of energy required to remove bonding electrons from an atom's valence electron shells.
The theory is based in the core on our views about the properties of the electron shells and sub-shells in atoms, which obviously change with increasing nuclear change (the nuclei themselves remains unchanged in chemical reactions).
In contrast to this approach, when I tackled this problem, I used neither calculation for the limits of stability of the electron shells in atoms, nor experiments on synthesis of new elements, but absolutely another theoretical approach which allowed me for formulation of a new law in the Periodic Table and, as a result, the upper limit in it.

Full browser ?