electron shell


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electron shell

[i′lek‚trän ′shel]
(atomic physics)
The collection of all the electron states in an atom which have a given principal quantum number.
The collection of all the electron states in an atom which have a given principal quantum number and a given orbital angular momentum quantum number.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consider the heavy atom nucleus, for example, [sub.82][Pb.sup.207], wherein there is a fourth filled electron shell with 32 electrons and, accordingly, the fourth layer of 16 clusters in the nucleus.
Electron shells of the atoms (known also as the levels) are regularly denoted as K, L, M, N, O, or as plain numbers from 1 to 5.
(All of the elements in the same row, or period, have the same number of electron shells.)
Students are first introduced to the concept of electron shells, emphasizing that each shell can only hold a specific number of electrons, two for the first, eight each for the second and third.
You can show students electron shells (varied orbits around the nucleus, each with a specific electron count).
Because the dots, also called pancake atoms, are so fiat, the electron shells are different than usual.
Like ordinary atoms, clusters with unfilled electron shells are chemically reactive.
The electron spin resonance phenomenon is shown by atoms having an odd number of electrons, ions having partly filled inner electron shells and other molecules that carry angular momentum of electronic origin.
It affects the electron shells of atoms without having any significant effects on their nuclei.
The 4f electrons of the lanthanide series of the elements (La - Lu), being well shielded by intervening electron shells, are largely unreactive with neighboring ligands.

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