electron-beam welding

electron-beam welding

[i′lek‚trän ‚bēm ′weld·iŋ]
(metallurgy)
A technique for joining materials in which highly collimated electron beams are used at a pressure below 10-3 mmHg (0.1333 pascal) to produce a highly concentrated heat source; used in outer space.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to solve these problems, many welding methods have been practiced to investigate the joining between titanium alloys and stainless steels, mainly including brazing welding [7, 16-20], laser welding [2, 5, 6, 21-25], electron-beam welding [26-31], diffusion bonding [32-36], explosive welding [37-40], and friction stir welding [41-47].
Electrical shocks of many types come into play in the practice of physicians, nurses, engineers, attorneys, and expert witnesses, and this will give them all core information on power-line electric currents and accidents, lightning, thermal injury, electrical shocking devices, high-frequency current, direct current, and electric-arc and electron-beam welding, along with material on the conducting properties of cells, organs fluids and body segments and the role and expectations of technical experts.
The assembly of planned orbital, lunar, and planetary manned space stations relies on electron-beam welding. Like lasers, high-voltage electron beams, accelerated and focused by electromagnetic fields, can instantly vaporize metals or create deep, narrow penetration burns.
Koleva, "Use of a secondary current sensor in plasma during electron-beam welding with focus scanning for process control," Journal of Sensors, vol.
As compared to the more commonly employed thermionic cathode approach for electron-beam formation, plasma cathode or plasma electron emitter approaches can produce greater emission current density, are capable of pulsed beam generation, can operate over a wide range of back-ground gas pressure, and are only weakly dependent on the residual vacuum conditions, among other advantages which make them attractive for applications such as electron-beam welding and powder cladding, modification of material surface properties, generation of electromagnetic raditaino, plasma chemical and radiation technologies, and more.
Is there a competition now between YAG and electron-beam welding? "Not at the lower power," Walker feels, "but this will happen when YAG gets into higher power levels--several kilowatts.
Electron-beam welding (EBW) offers many benefits, including deep, narrow, and almost parallel side welds, plus low total heat input and comparatively small heat-affected zones.

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