electron-positron pair

electron-positron pair

[i¦lek‚trän ′päz·ə‚trän ‚per]
(physics)
An electron and a positron produced at the same time in the interaction of a photon with a high-intensity electric field.
References in periodicals archive ?
For an electron-positron pair production or annihilation amplitude we give a similar definition of locality.
For example, the electron-positron pair is a type of unmatter.
Even the most pure and holy of all things in the world, namely the light photon has opposite characteristics of a particle and a wave and also is a composite of two matter --antimatter particles and can be resolved into a pair of the particles such as the electron-positron pair if the photon has enough energy equivalent of the mass of the particle pair.
The experimenters now suppose that some new subatomic particle, electrically neutral with a mass three to four times that of the electron, is produced in these nucleus-nucleus collisions, and it then decays to an electron-positron pair.
This can happen under the same weak interaction, provided the neutrino collides with the anti-neutrino to create the electron-positron pair.
Recalling that any sufficiently strong positive potential acting on the vacuum state enables electron-positron pair production to take place in free space (see any relativistic discussion of the Klein Paradox, e.
Then, given the experimental fact of electron-positron pair creation, it is reasonable to conclude that the incident free electron creates such pairs when it "collides" with the stressed portion of the vacuum (z > 0), the positrons (Dirac "holes") proceeding to the right into the vacuum after the collision [8, fig.
The elementary electron-positron pair formation process is considered in terms of a revised quantum electrodynamic theory, with special attention to the conservation of energy, spin, and electric charge.
The motion of the electron-positron pair causes a Doppler shift on the energy of the annihilation radiation.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Researchers produced a record high number of electron-positron pairs, opening exciting opportunities to study extreme astrophysical processes, such as black holes and gamma-ray bursts.
The creation of electron-positron pairs would cause a loss of pressure, further accelerating the collapse; as a result, the two orbiting fragments would ultimately become so dense that a black hole could form at each clump.
From this information and new computer modeling led by Fabrizio Tavecchio and Gabriele Ghisellini at Merate Observatory, the team could rule out the presence of electron-positron pairs.

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