electronic structure

electronic structure

[i‚lek′trän·ik ′strək·chər]
(physics)
The arrangement of electrons in an atom, molecule, or solid, specified by their wave functions, energy levels, or quantum numbers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kathami (San Jose State) , we fed an electronic image archive gathered over about 20 years -- 1000s of electronic structure images -- into these artificial neural networks.
They address electronic structure principles, such as the electronegativity equalization principle, harness equalization principle, electrophilicity equalization principle, nucleophilicity equalization principle, and studies based on these electronic structure principles.
IBM has simulated the electronic structure of a small molecule, using a seven-qubit quantum computer.
[7] used the first-principles method to investigate the interface adhesion energy, interface energy, interface fracture toughness, and electronic structure of the [beta]-SiC(111)/[alpha]-Ti(0001) heterojunction.
By intricately manipulating matter on a nanoscale, the team etched the unique 2D electronic structure of graphene onto a semiconductor material called gallium arsenide.
The way in which electrons behave inside a solid is governed by its electronic structure, an intertwined network of 'bands' which define the allowed energies and momenta of electrons in the solid.
[14] according to n(mod 3) = 1 classification, the effect of multi-vacancies on the electronic structure of (10,0) semiconducting carbon nanotube is investigated and divacancy is found to have a significant effect on the band gap of the semiconducting nanotubes.
Nieminen, "Electronic structure of boron nitride sheets doped with carbon from first-principles calculations," Physical Review B--Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, vol.
Neugebauer and Van De Walle calculated the electronic structure and atomic structure of the intrinsic defects of GaN by first principles [5].
Hou, "Electronic structure of atomic Ti chains on semiconducting graphene nanoribbons: a first-principles Study," Journal of Chemical Physics, vol.
The technique contributed significantly to the present understanding of the electronic structure of most typical semiconductors [3] and has found continuity as a valuable characterisation tool of novel materials, like dilute nitrides [4], low-dimensional structures [5, 6], and their potential applications [7].
"It's fundamentally interesting and important because it's such a curious thing," says physicist David Petrosyan of the Institute of Electronic Structure & Laser at the Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas in Heraklion, Greece.

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