electronvolt

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electronvolt

a unit of energy equal to the work done on an electron accelerated through a potential difference of 1 volt. 1 electronvolt is equivalent to 1.602 × 10--19 joule.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Electronvolt

A unit of energy used for convenience in atomic systems. Specifically, it is the change in energy of an electron, or of any particle having a charge numerically equal to that of an electron, when it is moved through a difference of potential of 1 mks volt. Its value (in mks units) is obtained from the equation W = qV, where W is energy in joules, q the charge in coulombs, and V the potential difference in volts. For a potential difference of 1 volt and the electronic charge of 1.602 × 10-19 coulomb, the electronvolt is 1.602 × 10-19 joule. See Electron, Ionization potential

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Physics. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

electronvolt

(i-lek-tron-vohlt ) Symbol: eV. A unit of energy equal to the energy acquired by an electron falling freely through a potential difference of one volt. It is equal to 1.6022 × 10–19 joule. High-energy electromagnetic radiation is usually referred to in terms of the energy of its photons: a photon energy of 100 eV is equivalent to a radiation frequency of 2.418 × 1016 hertz. The energies of elementary particles are usually quoted in eV; their rest masses are generally referred to in terms of their energies in eV.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

electronvolt

[i′lek‚trän ‚vōlt]
(physics)
A unit of energy which is equal to the energy acquired by an electron when it passes through a potential difference of 1 volt in a vacuum; it is equal to (1.60217646±0.00000006) × 10-19 volt. Abbreviated eV.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
By the time the particles had reached energies of about 20,000,000 electronvolts (20 MeV), however, they had gained so much mass, in line with special relativity (see 1905), that they were curving less sharply and their circlings within the instrument fell out of phase with the periodic alternations of the magnetic field.
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The best guess of most physicists is that the Higgs weighs somewhere between 114 and 600 gigaelectronvolts (109 electronvolts), according to Sergio Bertolucci, CERN's director for research and computing.
From just above 10 million trillion electronvolts to three times that energy, the number of iron nuclei appears to rise steeply, with heavy nuclei ultimately dominating the cosmic ray population, Cronin reported.
London, March 24 (ANI): Engineers at CERN have decided March 30 as the date to make their first attempt to collide beams at an energy of 3.5 trillion electronvolts (TeV) per beam at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), to begin hunt for the elusive 'God Particle'.
The new data point to a WIMP with a mass in the range of 7-11 billion electronvolts.
At first the plan was just to upgrade BESSY I from 800 million electronvolts (MeV) to 1 billion electronvolts (GeV), but now SESAME will be an even bigger machine.
telescope system in Namibia over a total observation period of 119 hours to detect the expected gamma rays at energies exceeding 220 GeV (billion electronvolts).
The physicists calculated the new particle's mass at 6.2 billion electronvolts, about six times that of a proton and very close to theorists' predictions.