electrophoretic display


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electrophoretic display

[i‚lek·trō·fə′red·ik di′splā]
(optics)
A liquid crystal display in which a light-absorbing dye has been added to the liquid to improve both color and luminance contrast.
References in periodicals archive ?
Displaydata's labels also feature the latest electrophoretic display (EPD) technology and provide superior image quality, color consistency and brightness," Dark adds.
The company currently has 6 patent portfolios in the areas of Key Based Encryption, E-Paper Electrophoretic Display, Nano Field Emission Display ( NFED ), Micro Electro Mechanical Systems Display ( MEMS ), Loyalty Point Conversion Systems, and Window Frame Construction.
The company currently has 4 patent portfolios in the areas of Key Based Encryption, E-Paper[R] Electrophoretic Display, Nano Field Emission Display ("NFED"), and Micro Electro Mechanical Systems Display ("MEMS").
Ebook readers long have employed a type of electronic paper known as the electrophoretic display (EPD).
When you look at simple LCD displays or a Kindle with its electrophoretic display, you are looking at something that changes from white and non-colored to black," Discovery News quoted John Reynolds, a scientist at the University of Florida who led a team that developed the clear-to-black polymers, as saying.
The electrophoretic display (IPD) is common to the most popular e-Readers like the Kindle, Sony Reader, and Nook.
Using electrophoretic display (patented technology from E-Ink Corp) which happened with over ten years of research at MIT (by Prof.
The new prototype is an active matrix electrophoretic display, similar to the screens used in today's e-readers, the companies say, except it is made of flexible plastic instead of glass.
It has revealed that the colour version will be based on technology called an electrophoretic display.
The electrophoretic display (600-by-800-pixel, 167-pixels-per-inch) delivers crisp black text, in a choice of six type sizes, that can be read even in dim light.
Nearly all e-book devices currently in the market use E Ink's electrophoretic display technology, with a small number--such as Fujitsu's FLEPia--using cholesteric LCD (liquid crystal display) technology.