elegiac


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Related to elegiac: elegiac couplet

elegiac

1. resembling, characteristic of, relating to, or appropriate to an elegy
2. denoting or written in elegiac couplets or elegiac stanzas
3. an elegiac couplet or stanza
References in periodicals archive ?
The intensity of Smith's early homage to Petrarch becomes diluted as Elegiac Sonnets expands through seven more editions and a second volume before her death in 1806.
After a painful process of re-mapping himself, and settling for substitutions, Vardaman reaches the moment of revelation in the dark barn (which is the elegiac painful descent into the dark that precedes any revelation) where he can cry, and by so doing release his anger.
In the subsequent Capitoli section of her Rime, Stampa surpasses Colonna in exploiting the elegiac discourse of the love complaint in the Ovidian style, which render these verses outright "apetrarkistisch" (306), but further Legitimize female poetic writing.
4) As these poets speak to one another through the elegiac genre, they position their "sympathies" as a kind of poetic economy: what they value and the idea of value as it distinctly relates to their position as women poets.
Dodson provides beginning readers of American poet John Berryman's 1969 The Dream Songs with a vehicle for approaching the long poem and finding the unity in its elegiac structure.
Looking at time in terms both micro- and macrocosmic, corporeal and intellectual, the curators afford themselves a flexible, elegiac scaffolding for the art on view, moving relatively freely in their selections from phenomenological to social and ideological subjects.
And in the restrained, elegiac "The Slow Drug," physical sounds--Harvey wetting her lips before a line; her breaths; saliva clicking at the roof of her mouth--come through nearly as loudly as the quiet intensity of her voice.
For instance, the most tender, elegiac, melancholic poem by Ronsard, "Comme on void sur la branche au mois de May la rose" strangely becomes for Jeanneret nothing more than another proof that in nature "where everything is reborn" the body of Marie can be at the same time dead and alive (38).
Liz Hamel's performance of "Dido's Lament," from Henry Purcell's Dido and Aeneas, lent an elegiac note.
Baillargeon tracks Jutra from his restless new wave films to Mon oncle Antoine (1971), the formalized and elegiac period piece that tops many best Canadian movie lists, to a string of commercial disappointments, including the dark romance of Kamouraska (1973), and some movies made in English Canada (Surfacing, 1981; By Design, 1982).
In her chapter on painters in the cultural wilderness, Munson spends an elegiac moment with Alan Cote, an abstract painter, who muses that "painting is `in a time of quietude, a time when people who really want to do it are going to do it.