elegiac


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Related to elegiac: elegiac couplet

elegiac

1. resembling, characteristic of, relating to, or appropriate to an elegy
2. denoting or written in elegiac couplets or elegiac stanzas
3. an elegiac couplet or stanza
References in periodicals archive ?
Elegiac should go well and will give her plenty to think about," he said.
Using Chiori Miyagawa's adaptation of John Gillespie's prior translation of the Japanese-language play by Shimizu Kunio, this production already perfected its mix of satirical humor and elegiac melancholy when it premiered two years ago.
The author of the book is famous novelist, elegiac poem writer and poet Parveen Haider, said a statement issued here.
It's a great opportunity to catch works by British choreographer David Dawson, whose fluid, hyperphysical movement vocabulary turns elegiac in On the Nature of Daylight (score by Max Richter) and delightfully virtuosic in 5 (excerpted from his Giselle).
Skirting the thorny debates about the generic definition of the Metamorphoses, Mayor scrutinizes how a new literary context assimilates the world of subjective elegy/ He observes the possible transformation undergone by elegiac forms once Ovid incorporates them into a poem whose central theme is precisely change.
(2) This is perhaps most strikingly illustrated in the poem's first section, as Satan obsessively recapitulates the fall of the angels and describes his mingled bewilderment and despair at the punishment that he and his followers have earned through elegiac questions such as "Hwaer com engla orym, / pe we on heofnum habban sceoldan?" (36-37; Where has the glory of angels come, which we ought to have in heaven?) and lamentations that he must "wadan wraeclastas" (120; traverse paths of exile).
In her speech in Propertius 4.7, the ghostly Cynthia portrays herself as the elegiac hero: she is faithful and long-suffering while the lover-poet is faithless and cruel.
(1) In this last work, Woolf joins her contemporaries in making the elegiac mode one of the dominant strains of modernist literature, but her participation has a critical edge to it.
(1) With her first small volume of poetry titled Elegiac Sonnets, and Other Essays, Charlotte Smith of Bignor Park entered the English literary marketplace in 1784 as a Petrarch for her era, aspiring to both the lifetime recognition and lasting fame achieved by her laureled fourteenth-century Italian predecessor.
The water imagery, with its sinuous flow, casual surrealism and dreamlike, ominous quality, underscored by jazz guitarist Bill Frisell's bluesy, elegiac score, slowly reveals a racial divide eerily similar to the one informing Spike Lee's magisterial Katrina doc "When the Levees Broke:' An art piece, a sociopolitical document and a musical meditation, "Flood" should strike chords with niche audiences.
It is an elegant and elegiac ode to a motherland from a devoted son.
But in the end, it's elegiac. In the post-9/11 world, such clandestine urban explorations have become more difficult and dangerous--because of authority, not physical reality.