elegiac

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elegiac

1. resembling, characteristic of, relating to, or appropriate to an elegy
2. denoting or written in elegiac couplets or elegiac stanzas
3. an elegiac couplet or stanza
References in periodicals archive ?
21) The beloved of Lauro (Lorenzo), Ambra was pursued by the river-god, Ombrone, but before he could have his way with her, she was metamorphosed into rock, the very stone upon which Lorenzo's villa elegiacally rises, a memorial to this lost love.
These were, the script elegiacally relates, 'youths, their bodies overflowing with life.
I do not intend to imply that Carter felt the approach of death and thus consciously sang elegiacally in Wise Children; rather, I wish to suggest that in her final novel Carter changes the focus of her metafictional musings.
This perspectival conjunction (and the shared dactylic impulse, both epically and elegiacally inflected) suggests that the two poems are attempting, at least in part, to come to grips with a single phenomenon.
His vision encompasses the planet's gaze directed back at the earth itself and, on September 30, 1820, the seas from which Keats gazes at an evening sky or surveys almost elegiacally a poem of his own design.
Ah, dear boy, tra-la-la, tra-la-la, I need no statue to help me echo elegiacally down the ages.
The question that is left hanging is this: How can we reconcile this amicable version of psychic revolt with the other more political (and violent) version that Kristeva analyzes, somewhat elegiacally, in Totem and Taboo?
The terraced, polyethylene-lined Caterpillar-crushed landmass is hard by the now-defunct works of Bethlehem Steel, smokestacks elegiacally dormant, the growing mound a symbol of consumption's triumph over production.
Horns and the rest of their brass colleagues were outstanding in the first set of the English Dances by Malcolm Arnold, BPO's patron; we also admired the elegiacally rich depth of string tone in Sibelius' sad little Valse Triste.
The Brothers" and "Michael" tell tragic histories within communities elegiacally imagined.