elegiac

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elegiac

1. resembling, characteristic of, relating to, or appropriate to an elegy
2. denoting or written in elegiac couplets or elegiac stanzas
3. an elegiac couplet or stanza
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Inspired by the Englishman Thomas Gray's "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard" (1751), Millevoye created the prototypical image of the doomed jeune malade, the young invalid who, "triste, et mourant a son aurore" ("sad, and dying in the dawn of his years"), wanders elegiacally amid an autumnal wood in his 1811 poem "La Chute des Feuilles" ("The Falling of the Leaves"; Millevoye 79X5 Raging against his own mortality, longing for the beloved he cannot now marry, and melancholically contemplating the transience of life, Millevoye's jeune malade is Faust, Werther, and Hamlet by turns.
Parreno's unnervingly blank, glowing marquees seem to elegiacally acknowledge the likely demise of the movie theater, one of the chief sites where the subjects of industrial modernity were able to leave the here and now behind--where spectators could sit down in the dark, fix their eyes on a monumental screen, and find themselves transported almost anywhere, anywhere out of the world.
Whereas Allemagne 90 elegiacally registered the demise of "really existing socialism," Pavsek, basing his argument on the Badiou lecture on Husserlian geometry briefly shown in Film socialisme, argues that the later film "calls for a return to 'socialism as origin'" (71).
"'I never was.'" And finally there is Anne Elliot, heartbreak turned to happiness, but not before, in her last completed novel, Austen has self-consciously planted her flag as the voice of women in fiction; in an uncommonly lovely sentiment on the part of a woman whose own love life seems narrow and foreshortened, she writes, elegiacally, "'All the privilege I claim for my own sex (it is not a very enviable one, you need not covet it) is that of loving longest, when existence or when hope is gone.'"
Carol Fry observes that "[Smith's] work gradually evolved to the sort of symbolic identity with nature that characterizes Wordsworth's poetry, beginning with a perception of correspondences between nature and the poet's mood or experience and moving towards a realization of nature's permanence and healing power." (61) The realization of nature's healing power is forcefully present in many passages in The Emigrants and The Beachy Head, but such power is either located in an elegiacally viewed past or remains at best potential for the sentimental subject weighed down by oppressive social forces and her own sympathetic suffering.
"We've reached a point where our most important elites do not join anything with anybody else," says Theda Skocpol, a professor of government at Harvard who wrote elegiacally about the history of membership groups and fraternal organizations in her book Diminished Democracy.
Its meditative footage veers from water going over a falls, to a beautiful young woman being caressed by her lover, to an older woman putting on makeup or elegiacally at work in her garden, where her younger self later appears.
In the first instance of seeing, Darwish declares a singular self that creates its private lexicon of sorrow and praise and transformation into the collective: a prebiblical past, a Palestinian present, and a future where the self flies "just to fly," free from "the knot of symbols," to where compassion is "one in the nights" with "one moon for all, for both sides of the trench." In Eleven Planets, the self has vanished into its other, more elegiacally, and "flight" has reached 1492, the year of "the Atlantic banners of Columbus" and "the Arab's last exhalation" in Granada.
The driver bobbed his head elegiacally and then reached through the open door of his cab, unhooked some wooden prayer beads from his rearview mirror, and offered them to her.
Although in the 1871 "Drum-Taps" the remaining assertions of such love are primarily for the dead, they nonetheless articulate a passion that had characterized the living and now elegiacally lingers as a model of masculine behavior.
But it's not all zaniness: Fisher writes elegiacally about growing up with a famous mother.
It is traipsed across by departed icons treated philosophically, rather than elegiacally, inserted into a stream of cultural ficures stretching its long fingers into the sedimentary rock of human existence.